Tag: Medicaid

Thinking Outside the ObamaCare Box

By Kelly McCutchen Health care costs threaten to bankrupt our country. Debates over Medicaid expansion, the Medicare “doc fix,” the State of Georgia’s health plan, coverage of autism and so many other health care issues merely shift these costs from one party to another. The time has come for a “let’s go to the moon” challenge that truly addresses the underlying problems. Higher education costs are on a similar trajectory. A few years ago, governors Rick Perry of Texas and Rick Scott of Florida challenged their higher education institutions to design a four-year bachelor’s degree program for $10,000 or less. Not $10,000 a year but $10,000 for all four years. Many schools rose to the challenge, met it and now… View Article

Checking Up On Health: April 1, 2014

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD “Health Reform 2.0: The Great Debate”: Are you a member of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation? If so, it gets you a discount rate to attend the first face-to-face debate between two of the nation’s most influential health care experts as they battle with ideas regarding the future of health reform in the United States: John Goodman, a key thought leader for free market solutions and Dr. Kenneth Thorpe, who worked in the Clinton administration on “HillaryCare,” has been an advisor to Congress, and has been a key resource to most every Democratic presidential nominee during the last 20 years. The conference is hosted by the Institute… View Article

Designing An Alternative to Medicaid Expansion

Key components for an alternative to Medicaid expansion: Catastrophic insurance. A private insurance policy provides catastrophic coverage, protecting individuals (and taxpayers) from large, unexpected expenses and giving individuals peace of mind that they are covered if they need major surgery or need expensive treatment for a condition such as cancer. Private insurance means individuals avoid the problems with many providers refusing to see new Medicaid patients. Reasonable cost sharing. The coverage is not free, but requires reasonable payments of up to 5 percent of income. This limits “crowd out” where individuals who are already paying for insurance drop their private insurance for the “free” government coverage. According to the Census Bureau, 222,000 adults with income below the Federal… View Article
RON BACHMANSenior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia Public Policy Foundation senior fellow Ron Bachman discussed Medicaid expansion and improved access to health care during a recent guest segment on GPB’s “On The Story.”  The video is available online.  Bachman supports improved access to healthcare for all Georgians but he opposes Medicaid expansion. “I am worried about access to real quality healthcare,” said Bachman. “In the private market 79 percent of physicians accept children but in the Medicaid market only 47 percent do.  One of the reasons we have our emergency rooms and hospitals packed with so many Medicaid patients is that primary physicians won’t see them so their only choice is to go to emergency rooms.” The panel… View Article
There are many downsides to adding even more people into an expensive, over-regulated Medicaid program,[1] but that doesn’t mean Georgia shouldn’t try to propose a better option. This is an opportunity to create a less expensive, more effective plan.   Goals of Expanded Access: Insure for unexpected, expensive health care outcomes to protect individuals and taxpayers Improve health outcomes by improving access to primary care Discourage expensive trips to emergency rooms for routine care Discourage crowding out private insurance coverage Called “the most innovative and successful reform of Medicaid in the history of the program” by Forbes magazine’s Avik Roy, Indiana’s expansion of health insurance to low-income citizens is a good model to analyze. Healthy Indiana[2] The Hoosier State’s… View Article
Atlanta Journal-Constitution conservative columnist Kyle Wingfield and Georgia Center for Opportunity vice president Eric Cochling discuss eight issues that impact Georgians.  This conversation was recorded at our “Georgia Legislative Roundup” policy leadership breakfast on March 26 at The Georgian Club in Cobb County.  Segment introductions by Kelly McCutchen. Eric Cochling:  Georgia Criminal Justice Reform Success Kyle Wingfield: Balanced Budget Constitutional Amendment Initiatives Eric Cochling: Child Welfare and Foster Care Reform  Kyle Wingfield: Traffic Congestion and Transportation $$$ Eric Cochling:  Education Funding and School Choice Kyle Wingfield: Georgia Income Tax and Pension Reform Eric Cochling: Medicaid and Access to Health Care Kyle Wingfield: Entrenched Threats to Innovation  … View Article

Friday Facts: March 28, 2014

It’s Friday!  Events  April 24: Matt Candler, founder and CEO of 404 Schools, keynotes, “School Choice: Big Gains in The Big Easy,” the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast at 8 a.m. at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public and is $25 to attend. Register at http://bit.ly/1lmETV5. Quotes of Note  “The fact that only a small percentage of medical errors are dealt with in the malpractice system suggests that it’s not a system. It deals in an incredibly inefficient way with a small percentage of the actual errors and in such a way that it does not make the performance of the overall system better. It’s not addressing why the error was made in… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 25, 2014

Health Care Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Yesterday, an e-mail from the White House turned up in my mailbox. From President Obama, no less. The salutation was, “Hey – ” (As an aside, I’m a bit of a fuddy-duddy when it comes to how I’m addressed. “Hey” isn’t a favorite. I blame my mother – or, as she used to say, “Hay is for horses.” I left my first doctor when I immigrated to the United States back in the horse-and-carriage days because he called me “Honey.” I figure I paid him enough to remember my name. … ) It was an urgent reminder about the “Affordable” Care Act, AKA ObamaCare. The President pointed… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 18, 2014

Health Care Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD ObamaCare Why no Medicaid expansion for Georgia? Just the expansion of Medicaid would cost Georgia an additional $2.5 billion over 10 years, Gov. Nathan Deal pointed out in an interview with Georgia Health News that was released Tuesday. “We simply cannot afford the $2.5 billion in new spending that the expansion would require without a severe impact on public education. The federal administration needs to start acknowledging the Supreme Court ruling and look at other alternatives that don’t force new spending by the state. I have often discussed the advantages of a block grant. States need more flexibility in order to make their program work for… View Article
The federal government spent more on broken state-run exchanges than it did on its own troubled system. Of the 14 states, plus the District of Columbia, that established their own health insurance coverage under Obamacare, seven remain dysfunctional, disabled, or severely underperforming. Development of those exchanges was funded heavily by the federal government through a series of grants that totaled more than $1.2 billion—almost double the $677 million cost of development for the federal exchange. The Reason Foundation published a rundown of the troubled state exchanges and the federal grants they qualified for. Oregon No exchange failed more fully or more spectacularly than Cover Oregon. The site was touted as an ambitious, expansive vision for what a state-run exchange… View Article

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State Representative Bob Irvin more quotes