Tag: Health Care

Checking Up on Health

Health Policy Briefs: February 28, 2012 Compiled by Benita Dodd Registration is open and seats are filling quickly for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s next Leadership Breakfast, 8 a.m. Thursday, March 22, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. State Attorney General Sam Olens and health care expert Ronald E. Bachman will give the “Georgia Health Care Update,” just days before the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in the challenge to the constitutionality of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Georgia is one of 26 states and the National Federation of Independent Business that filed the challenge to the law. The cost to register for the Leadership Breakfast is $25. Register here: http://tinyurl.com/7ldaqnk. Find out more here:… View Article

Checking up on Health

Health Policy Briefs: February 21, 2012 Compiled by Benita Dodd Mark your calendar: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation hosts Attorney General Sam Olens and health care expert Ronald E. Bachman at 8 a.m. Thursday, March 22, at a Leadership Breakfast at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The topic is “Georgia Health Care Update,” and the event takes place just one week before the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in the challenge to the constitutionality of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Georgia is one of 26 states and the National Federation of Independent Business that filed the challenge to the law. The cost to register for the Leadership Breakfast is $25. Registration will open soon at www.georgiapolicy.org View Article

Checking Up on Health

Health Policy Briefs: January 31, 2012 Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Price controls: Everence Insurance of Pennsylvania on Monday became the first insurer flagged by federal regulators for having an unreasonable rate increase. The insurer, a for-profit arm of the Mennonite Church USA, raised rates starting in September by 11.6 percent for its ShareNet policies covering 4,800 people working for small businesses in the state. Now the insurer has 10 days to either withdraw the increase or post on its Web site the reasons it finds the increase to be justified, Kaiser Health News reports. The growth of account-based health care plans: Employers first started offering account-based health plans in 2001, when a handful of employers began… View Article

Checking Up on Health

                                           A Health Policy Checkup Supreme Court schedule for federal health care law case: For those who are interested in following the litigation regarding the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, here is a link to the timetable between now and the end of oral argument before the U.S. Supreme Court on March 28: http://tinyurl.com/6r9cdzf. There are four distinct questions before the Court: 1. Individual mandate: Whether Congress went too far in requiring all Americans to purchase and maintain individual health insurance. 2. Severability: The Severability Clause, language that describes the right to remove a line or portion of a bill without changing the rest, was not included in this legislation, so that if any part… View Article
In July 2012, the headline that throws the country into turmoil could just be, “Supreme Court Rules Against Health Reform; Now What?” If the 26-state lawsuit succeeds against the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, then what? Part or all of the federal law will immediately be null and void. Insurance laws will revert to the inadequate state laws that existed before. Even before the new law, there was bipartisan agreement that health insurance needed reforms. In Georgia, those laws created 1.8 million uninsured Georgians; fewer than one in 4 Georgians working in small businesses were insured. The battle cry is “repeal and replace” from federal politicians, but if the major responsibility for reform goes back to the states,… View Article
Georgia should establish a small business health insurance marketplace outside the “additional layers of cost, complexity and rigidity” associated with federal health care reform mandates. That is the recommendation from a twenty-five member committee appointed by Governor Nathan Deal.   The political question will soon become:  Should Georgia begin that process now or wait until after next summer’s highly anticipated U.S. Supreme Court health care reform decision? The Georgia Health Insurance Exchange Advisory Committee report issued Monday proposed development of an exchange “through private or limited quasi-governmental means” as either a non-profit or public corporation.  The report did not establish a timetable.  A minority view said the 2012 Legislature should “authorize a basic structure for an individual health insurance exchange” that… View Article

What Should You Pay for Your Dog’s Knee Transplant?

What should you expect to pay for your dog’s knee replacement?  Should what you pay for your dog to have his knees fixed bear any relationship to fixing your own knees?   What determines the cost for knee replacements, whether the surgery is done here or overseas? Writing this week on his national Health Care Policy blog, economist John Goodman asked, “Why is the price of a knee replacement for a dog — involving the same technology and the same medical skills that are needed for humans — less than 1/6th the price a typical health insurance company pays for human operations?” Goodman also posed this question: “How is a Canadian able to come to the United States and get… View Article
One supposed benefit of socialized medicine is access to low-cost medicines, right? A new study by the Fraser Institute highlights some important facts when comparing the U.S. and Canada. By observing per capita drug spending as a percentage of per capita income the study compares the average personal affordability of drug costs for Canadians and Americans.  The method provides a way to estimate the actual economic burden of prescription drug costs on consumers in Canada and the United States relative to the differences in living standards. Consumers in Canada and the United States spend nearly the same proportion of their per capita gross domestic product on prescription drugs (1.6 percent in Canada and 1.8 percent in the United States) and… View Article

Myth Busters #1: Roemer’s Law

If you ask anyone who has studied health economics or health policy in the last 40 years, “what is Roemer’s Law?” they will each be able to tell you in an instant — “that means a built bed is a filled bed.” Milton Roemer, MD, was a researcher and professor, mostly at UCLA, who spent a lifetime (he died in 2001) advocating for national health systems around the world. He was involved in creating the World Health Organization in 1951 and Saskatchewan’s provincial single payer system in 1953. His “law” was based on a single study he did in 1959 that found a correlation between the number of hospital beds per person and the rate of hospital days used per… View Article

Rationing Care for Children in Medicaid and CHIP

Physicians experience much greater difficulty referring children in Medicaid and CHIP to specialty care, compared to privately insured children. On the basis of the physician survey, more than three times as many participating physicians—84 percent—experience difficulty referring Medicaid and CHIP children to specialty care as experience difficulty referring privately insured children—26 percent. For all children, physicians most frequently cited difficulty with specialty referrals for mental health, dermatology, and neurology. Full GAO report here. View Article

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