Tag: Governor Nathan Deal

Friday Facts: December 7, 2012

It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note  “[T]he more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer … [taking] away from before their eyes the greatest of all inducements to industry, frugality, and sobriety, by giving them a dependence of somewhat else than a careful accumulation during youth and health for support in age and sickness. ” – Benjamin Franklin  “I favor the policy of economy, not because I wish to save money, but because I wish to save people. The men and women of this country who toil are the ones who bear the cost of the Government. Every dollar that we carelessly waste means that their life will be so… View Article
By Don Sullivan   At the third annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum in September, Kelly McCutchen of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation presented a “Plan B” for transportation. He emphasized the proposal was a “framework” to move forward the discussion after the TSPLOST regional sales tax referendum failed in nine of 12 regions in Georgia. It was a well thought out plan with which I mostly agreed.  McCutchen’s comments regarding the need to focus on funding regional intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and the Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) were spot on. Atlanta has long recognized the importance of ITS and, in fact, is the headquarters of RouteMatch, a Georgia company that provides vehicle tracking and is a leading national ITS… View Article
By Mike Klein When he recorded a Georgia Public Broadcasting studio audience program this week Governor Nathan Deal needed just two sentences to precisely capsulize why nearly everything that we think we know about learning and education should be reconsidered and re-engineered.  Mike Klein, Editor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation “We still live in an era in which everybody seems to think that unless your child has a college degree they are not successful.  We know that is not true,” Deal told a studio audience that watched the taping of Ignite, a GPB education web program. His conversation with host Anne Ostholthoff focused on college and career initiatives, a priority under Deal whose administration has recognized states left behind in… View Article
The U.S. Supreme Court has voted 5-4 to uphold the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act federal health care reform law. This means the individual mandate survives. There are questions about how this decision will affect state Medicaid programs, including Georgia Medicaid. Today we will monitor the extensive reactions to this historic decision. This is the second of two files on the Foundation blog. Please see the earlier file for those reactions earlier today. Compiled by Mike Klein. Cindy Zeldin Interview with Cindy Zeldin, Executive Director, Georgians for a Healthy Future: “It’s a big victory for Georgia health care consumers. We have big problems in our state. We have two million that don’t have health insurance.  We have consumers don’t… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, Editor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Governor Nathan Deal expressed displeasure with the U.S. Supreme Court decision on federal health care reform during a Thursday afternoon news conference, describing it as “the largest tax increase in the history of the United States, at least $500 billion and perhaps significantly more.”  The Governor also admitted he was surprised by the decision because he thought the Court had given “pretty strong signals” that it had problems with the individual mandate. The Governor appeared alone when he spoke to reporters and a large crowd that assembled in mid-afternoon inside the State Capitol.  Deal said the state will likely hold off making decisions on several questions until after the November… View Article
By Mike Klein Medicaid is a beast.  About one-in-five Georgians receives Medicaid health care.  That is 1.7 million people.  Fifty-nine percent of statewide births are Medicaid babies.  Another couple hundred thousand children are enrolled in PeachCare, the state children’s health insurance program.   Medicaid could grow by hundreds of thousands more if the U.S. Supreme Court upholds the federal health care reform law in its decision expected next month. Not at all surprisingly, Medicaid redesign questions were abundant when three of Governor Nathan Deal’s advisors met with Georgia Children’s Advocacy Network members at the Freight Depot in Atlanta.  The advisors made no presentations and took questions for almost 90 minutes. Health policy advisor Katie Rogers named telehealth reimbursement policies, portable electronic… View Article
By Mike Klein Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed thinks our classrooms need more hot air.  “We actually need STEAM – science, technology, engineering, arts and math,” Reed told an “Education Nation” audience Monday morning at the Georgia Aquarium.  Later he added, “America cannot continue to be what it has been if we continue to have the kind of educational system that we have.” “Education Nation” is a two-year-old NBC News project to create solutions-based conversations about learning in America.  Atlanta is one of five cities being toured this year.  Reed was joined onstage by Senator Johnny Isakson and Governor Nathan Deal in a discussion moderated by Meet the Press host David Gregory.  WXIA 11Alive is NBC’s “Education Nation” local… View Article
By Mike Klein Governor Nathan Deal signed criminal justice reform legislation Wednesday, triggering the most aggressive rebranding of the state’s approach to criminal perpetrators in several decades.  But one question that needs to be resolved is who’s responsible for making sure this all happens? It sounds like the answer begins with the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform whose work provided the structure for Georgia’s new law.  Governor Deal signed House Bill 1176 during an upbeat signing ceremony just below the north steps at the State Capitol in Atlanta. Answering a question from the Public Policy Foundation, the Governor said he would extend the Special Council by executive order, something he has previously discussed.  “We believe we should maybe expand… View Article
By Mike Klein Georgia criminal justice reform has passed both chambers but the House would need to agree to substitute legislation because the Senate added seven amendments when it passed the bill 51-0 on Tuesday afternoon.  Two other floor amendments failed and two were withdrawn. None of the amendments dramatically change Georgia’s most sweeping criminal justice reform since a generation of do the crime, do the time laws were passed some twenty years ago. Governor Nathan Deal made criminal justice reform a major priority during his first State of the State address in January 2011.  The work of the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform last year and the legislature this year are an important first step forward with others… View Article
PDF version of Issue Analysis: Peach State Criminal Justice: Controlling Costs, Protecting the Public Issue Analysis  Peach State Criminal Justice: Controlling Costs, Protecting the Public  By Marc A. Levin and Vikrant P. Reddy[1]  Introduction  Georgia has struggled to identify polices that properly differentiate between high-risk, violent offenders and lower-risk, nonviolent offenders. Though Georgia’s response to a nonviolent crime has often been to incarcerate, increasing prison populations and costs have led many to question whether probation or diversion to drug or mental health treatment may be better for public safety, better for taxpayers and even better for the offender. That was the conclusion reached in November 2011 by the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform for Georgians (“the Council”), a… View Article

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