Tag: Governor Nathan Deal

Published May 3, 2013 By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation One of the primary architects of the special council recommendations that became the basis for this year’s juvenile justice reform legislation says the primary reason that thousands of juveniles enter the legal system each year is because they come from dysfunctional families. “Most of the kids we’re seeing today in most courts are kids in which we have broken families, most of them have single parents, most of those are mothers and there are poor or very weak problem solving skills, not just among the young people but also their parents,” Clayton County Juvenile Court Chief Judge Steven Teske told the Georgia Public Policy Foundation this week.… View Article

Friday Facts: April 12, 2013

 April 12, 2013  It’s Friday! Events April 23: The deadline is April 19 to register for “Telehealth: Taking Health Care to The Next Level,” the Foundation’s next Leadership Breakfast, at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, April 23, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The moderator is Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald of the Georgia Department of Public Health, with telemedicine expert panelists Dr. Jeffrey English, Dr. Jeffrey Grossman and Paula Guy of the Georgia Partnership for Telehealth. The cost is $25 to attend; register online at http://tinyurl.com/ck6v4yt. Find out more at www.georgiapolicy.org/?p=9075. (Attire: business, business casual.) April 18: Retired Georgia Tech Professor James H. Rust, a policy adviser for the Heartland Institute, gives a talk, “The Role of… View Article

What Farmers Can Teach Physicians

  By Dr. Jeffrey Grossman In 1900, one-third of the American labor force was committed to agricultural production. In 1950, food consumed at home was 22 percent of a household’s disposable income. By 1998, that percentage had dropped to 7 percent. This dramatic decrease in the cost of food was directly attributable to improved productivity through technology and the implementation of that technology. While this astounding increase in farmers’ productivity did create economic instability and the virtual abandonment of many rural Southern farming towns, the development of U.S. agriculture is overall a great success story. This transformational change in agriculture threatened many people’s livelihoods, particularly the small farmer. Many farmers banded together to form organizations and trade associations to protect… View Article

Friday Facts: March 15, 2013

It’s Friday! Events Today is the deadline to register for, “Morality and The Marketplace,” a Foundation Leadership Breakfast with keynote speaker Yaron Brook, executive director of the Ayn Rand Institute. The event begins 8 a.m. on Tuesday, March 19, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public and will cost $25 to attend. Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/btp5nge; register online at http://tinyurl.com/9wcmz5p. Dr. Brook’s book, “Free Market Revolution,” will be available for purchase at $20 per copy; $10 with student ID. March 27: The Foundation’s Annual Dinner is Wednesday, March 27, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Cobb Galleria Ballroom. The keynote speaker is Stephen Moore of The Wall Street Journal. Tickets… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Georgians will need a comfy couch, lots of time and perhaps some caffeine when they begin to read newly introduced juvenile justice and civil code legislation.  Juvenile justice provisions in  House Bill 242 include a proposal to completely revise the state’s 32-year-old juvenile Designated Felony Act, a long overdue step forward, by creating two classes of more and less serious juvenile felony crimes. Juvenile civil code revisions would update laws that govern how juvenile courts operate and the rights of minors in custody and other situations.  The legislation is a comfy couch read at 244 pages.  The juvenile justice sections closely follow the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform recommendations,… View Article

Medicaid Expansion: Hand Up or Handcuff?

By Ronald E. Bachman Medicaid has several components, but at its core it is a federal-state partnership to provide a health insurance program for the poor. Although states’ programs can differ, most provide for those below the poverty level. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act required that states expand Medicaid to those earning up to 138 percent of the poverty level (about $25,000 for a family of three). The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, however, that each state can accept or reject the federal expansion of Medicaid. Like other states, Georgia had to make that choice, and Gov. Nathan Deal is refusing to expand Medicaid. “I think that is something our state cannot afford,” Deal told reporters.” And even though… View Article

Friday Facts: January 18, 2013

January 18, 2013 It’s Friday! Events January 24, 2013: The deadline is Tuesday to register for the Foundation’s first Leadership Breakfast of 2013, “Moving Georgia Ahead: What’s Coming Down the Pike.” The 8 a.m. event at Cobb County’s Georgian Club will be keynoted by Robert W. Poole, Senior Fellow at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, co-founder of the Reason Foundation and Reason’s director of transportation policy. Poole, who attended the Transportation Research Board’s meeting this week in Washington, D.C., will provide an update on the outlook for transportation policy and funding. Registration is $25; register here: http://tinyurl.com/y27h3dk. Mark your calendar: Upcoming speakers at Foundation Leadership Breakfasts include Randal O’Toole of the Cato Institute on February… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, Editor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Governor Nathan Deal has proposed a $19.864 billion state dollars budget for the new fiscal year that starts in July, up about 2.7 percent from this year’s $19.341 billion budget.  The Fiscal 2014 proposed budget was released on the Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget website while Deal delivered his State of the State address at the Capitol.   Total state spending next year would be about $40.837 billion with the other $21 billion being anticipated federal funding. The trend line here continues to be fiscal savings and a big emphasis on health care cost strategy. Governor Deal devoted the bulk of his address to four policy areas – public safety,… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, Editor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Governor Nathan Deal said the state Department of Community Health has been told to reduce its amended current fiscal year budget by 3 percent and then find 5 percent more in new cuts next year to help the state absorb Medicaid costs that continue to escalate.  The state faces a Medicaid deficit that will approach $800 million during the next 18 months of its fiscal cycle. Deal devoted nearly his entire speech to health care expense when he addressed the Georgia Chamber of Commerce annual “Eggs and Issues” breakfast Wednesday at the World Congress Center in Atlanta.   The Governor also suggested folks who cannot attend Thursday morning’s State of the… View Article

Friday Facts: December 14, 2012

 It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note  “When you can’t afford what you’ve already got, why would you try to buy into more?” – Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, explaining why Georgia will not expand its Medicaid rolls  “The principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale.” – Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Taylor (May 28, 1816)  “With President Obama’s reelection and his commitment to investing in infrastructure, one cannot blame the transportation community for feeling hopeful. But with the country’s budget realities and debt limit negotiations constraining the president’s ability to push for ambitious new spending programs, transportation policy is not likely to receive high priority… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is something that I am proud to be a part of today. The research conducted by education groups like yours is invaluable in helping form opinions and allowing people to reach conclusions that ultimately help them make the right decisions.

Dan Amos, CEO, AFLAC more quotes