Tag: Georgia public policy

What Farmers Can Teach Physicians

  By Dr. Jeffrey Grossman In 1900, one-third of the American labor force was committed to agricultural production. In 1950, food consumed at home was 22 percent of a household’s disposable income. By 1998, that percentage had dropped to 7 percent. This dramatic decrease in the cost of food was directly attributable to improved productivity through technology and the implementation of that technology. While this astounding increase in farmers’ productivity did create economic instability and the virtual abandonment of many rural Southern farming towns, the development of U.S. agriculture is overall a great success story. This transformational change in agriculture threatened many people’s livelihoods, particularly the small farmer. Many farmers banded together to form organizations and trade associations to protect… View Article

Georgia Can Lead Again on Juvenile Justice Reform

By Newt Gingrich and Kelly McCutchen Newt Gingrich Kelly McCutchen Years of profound dysfunction in Washington have eroded Americans’ confidence in government. Our national leaders have lost virtually all their credibility when it comes to addressing society’s most pressing challenges. Fortunately, just as our Founders intended, states are increasingly finding innovative policy solutions for many of these problems. Can you imagine Congress ever accomplishing such a feat? Now Georgia has the opportunity to apply those same conservative convictions to its juvenile justice system by adopting the recommendations of the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform.  After months of research last year, the bipartisan Council produced proposals that will stop wasteful government spending and help more of Georgia’s young offenders fulfill… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 19, 2013

Benita DoddVice PresidentGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Health policy news and views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Upcoming Foundation event on telehealth: Find out what’s happening around the nation and in Georgia – and what needs to happen – when it comes to innovative implementation of telehealth for greater efficiency, greater cost-effectiveness, better quality, better access and a better patient experience. Register now for, “Telehealth: Taking Health Care to the Next Level,” a Georgia Public Policy Foundation Leadership Breakfast at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The panel discussion is moderated by Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Public Health, with panelists Dr. Jeffrey English of the Multiple Sclerosis Center of Atlanta, Dr.… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT INVITATION March 19, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Registration Open for, ‘Telehealth: Taking Health Care to the Next Level,’ A Georgia Public Policy Foundation Leadership Breakfast on April 23 Atlanta — The health care industry has embraced opportunities provided by information technology in numerous ways. But policy and politics still handicap the medical community when it comes to fully incorporating telemedicine and, more broadly, telehealth.  Find out what’s happening around the nation and in Georgia – and what needs to happen – when it comes to innovative implementation of telehealth for greater efficiency, greater cost-effectiveness, better quality, better access and a better patient experience. Register NOW for, “Telehealth: Taking Health Care View Article
  Albert Woodard By Albert Woodard The campaign in Georgia and in many states for adult and juvenile criminal justice reform has highlighted an alarming trend: Women represent a small portion of the prison population but their numbers are rising rapidly, with serious consequences for the children and communities they leave behind. The number of women incarcerated in the United States since 1990 has jumped an astounding 92 percent and shows no sign of receding. In fact, according to a recent study at the Northeastern College of Criminal Justice, prison rates for women are increasing faster than for men. The reasons for this increase are numerous, ranging from their historical offenses of larceny, forgery, embezzlement and prostitution, as well as… View Article

Friday Facts: March 15, 2013

It’s Friday! Events Today is the deadline to register for, “Morality and The Marketplace,” a Foundation Leadership Breakfast with keynote speaker Yaron Brook, executive director of the Ayn Rand Institute. The event begins 8 a.m. on Tuesday, March 19, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public and will cost $25 to attend. Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/btp5nge; register online at http://tinyurl.com/9wcmz5p. Dr. Brook’s book, “Free Market Revolution,” will be available for purchase at $20 per copy; $10 with student ID. March 27: The Foundation’s Annual Dinner is Wednesday, March 27, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Cobb Galleria Ballroom. The keynote speaker is Stephen Moore of The Wall Street Journal. Tickets… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 12, 2013

  Benita DoddVice PresidentGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd As if you’re not sick about unemployment already: Federal authorities and industry experts say the link between the federal Affordable Care Act and layoffs is becoming more pronounced, according to a report in Becker’s Hospital Review. The Federal Reserve’s “beige book,” which analyzes the economic conditions across various Fed districts throughout the country, notes, “Employers in several districts cited the unknown effects of the Affordable Care Act as reasons for planned layoffs and reluctance to hire more staff.” Aside from hiring changes, some districts, including Atlanta, are experiencing shortages in compliance experts due to the law’s regulatory complexity. Atlanta also reported that higher health care… View Article

Friday Facts: March 8, 2013

It’s Friday! Events March 19: There’s just one week left to register for, “Morality and The Marketplace,” a Foundation Leadership Breakfast with keynote speaker Yaron Brook, executive director of the Ayn Rand Institute. The event begins 8 a.m. on Tuesday, March 19, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public and will cost $25 to attend. Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/btp5nge; register online at http://tinyurl.com/9wcmz5p. March 27: The Foundation’s Annual Dinner is Wednesday, March 27, beginning 6:30 p.m. at the Cobb Galleria Ballroom. The keynote speaker is Stephen Moore of The Wall Street Journal. Tickets are $125 per person; sponsorships are available. To attend the dinner, register at http://tinyurl.com/b6m7au5.… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Not many people announce they’re going on a diet; it may fail and they’re left embarrassed. Around the country and in Georgia, planners are quietly going on “road diets” and hoping you’ll be so busy admiring the pretty streetscapes that you won’t notice the gradual shrinking of space for vehicular traffic until it’s too late. This social engineering move is euphemistically called “rightsizing streets.” It has little to do with transportation, and includes strategies such as “converting vehicle lanes to other uses, narrowing vehicle lanes, adding bike lanes, improving pedestrian infrastructure, changing parking configuration and adding roundabouts and medians,” according to the Project for Public Spaces, which earlier this year released a report called… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia lawmakers filed about five dozen public education bills in this year’s General Assembly, bills that address funding formulas, enhancements to parental school choice, tax credits, ideas to preserve HOPE financial aid, additional days for pre-K education programs and many more. Here is something lawmakers might want to think about:  Why was the employment growth rate for Georgia public school administrators and non-teaching staff nearly double the percentage growth rate in total student population between 1992 and 2009, at enormous real cost?  Also, why does Georgia employ more administrators and non-teaching staff than teachers? This data is found in “The School Staffing Surge,” a new report from the Friedman Foundation for… View Article

When I served four terms in the state Senate, one of the few places where you could go to always and get concrete information about real solutions was the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. That hasn’t changed. [The Foundation] is really right up there at the top of the state think tanks, so you should be very proud of the work that they are doing!

Congressman Tom Price more quotes