Tag: Georgia Public Policy Foundation

Expand Access to Care, Not Medicaid

By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Those addressing Georgia’s uninsured and failing hospitals seem stuck between two options: expanding a government program (Medicaid) with its own long list of challenges, or doing nothing. It’s a false choice. Expanding Medicaid is undoubtedly the worst option for providing more Georgians access. For providers – even with more money from the federal government – Medicaid still pays less than their cost. It’s a bad deal for taxpayers: Expansion is estimated to cost more than $7,000 for able-bodied adults; the current Medicaid program spends $3,022. If Georgia’s more than 200,000 low-income adults who already have private insurance opt for the “free” program, the cost will be even higher. It’s also a bad deal for recipients.… View Article

Friday Facts: July 1, 2016

July 1, 2016 It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), the only Republican among Georgia’s 10 Congressmen and two senators, was the Minority Whip of the House. Both chambers were majority Democrat. Today, both chambers are majority Republican; the former Georgia Congressman and U.S. House Speaker is being mentioned as a running mate for presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump; both Georgia senators and 10 of the 14 Congressmen are Republican. U.S. Rep. John Lewis is the only current Georgia member from the 102nd Congress. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes… View Article

Rome’s Free Clinic: Community Taking Charge

By Benita M. Dodd Dr. Leonard Reeves, president of the Faith and Deeds Community Health free clinic in Rome, oversees medical student volunteers from the Northwest Campus of the Medical College of Georgia. Dr. Leonard Reeves shares an experience that epitomizes his role as president of the Faith and Deeds Community Health free clinic in Rome, Ga. A forklift operator visited the emergency room a few years ago. “By the time I got to him he was already admitted,” recalls Reeves, a family practice physician. “He was diabetic and in renal failure. His kidneys were gone – in his 30s!” The man knew he had been diabetic since he was a teenager but did nothing about it. “A man who… View Article

Friday Facts: June 24, 2017

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the highest monthly average residential price of natural gas (August) was $7.36 per thousand cubic feet. Between then and now, the price climbed as high as $20.77 (July 2008); yet in January this year it was down to $8.30 per 1,000 cubic feet. We’re giving credit to new domestic shale discoveries and innovative fracking technology. Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia. … View Article

Rethinking Mandatory Minimum Sentences

By John G. Malcolm and John-Michael Seibler President Obama has publicly opined that mandatory minimum sentences ranging from 20 years to life in prison for drug offenses do not “fit the crime.” He has acted on that belief by commuting dozens of drug offenders’ sentences as Congress debates reform to various aspects of mandatory minimum sentencing laws. Sherman Chester is built like an NFL cornerback. His size belies a calm, respectful demeanor and a soft-spoken wit. On politics, he says he registered to vote as a Republican in 1984 because “Ronald Reagan was in office” and “America was doing it!” And when asked how he felt when he received a mandatory life sentence without parole for selling cocaine and heroin,… View Article

Friday Facts: June 17, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, electronic messages were hardly the norm; the term “email” gained popularity by 1993. Today, According to the Harvard Business Review, email takes up 23 percent of the average employee’s workday and, collectively, we send more than 108 billion emails a day in the United States. Guide to the Issues 2016, compiled by the Foundation, is now available online. Each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia.  Quotes of Note  “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those… View Article
The Savannah Morning News edition of June 12, 2016 published a commentary by Georgia Public Policy Foundation President Kelly McCutchen criticizing Savannah’s plans to consider city-owned broadband. The link is here; the commentary is published below in in its entirety. Kelly McCutchen: City-owned broadband a bad idea Last month, the city of Savannah issued a request for proposal (RFP) seeking a company to evaluate the state of broadband services available in the city and to develop a strategic plan that will address any current gaps in service. The RFP says the plan to address gaps should include ideas for public-private partnerships or outline “various business models for municipal broadband delivery.” That phrase makes it clear that officials in Savannah… View Article

Friday Facts: June 10, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, inflation was 4.2 percent. Last year, it was 0.1 percent. Guide to the Issues 2016, compiled by the Foundation, is now available online. Each chapter includes principles for reform, facts on the issue, background information and, in most cases, positive solutions to the challenges facing Georgia. Quotes of Note “Policy by policy and decision by decision, federal regulatory agencies have eroded the nation’s competitiveness, ability to innovate, and capacity to create wealth.” – Henry I. Miller “The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance… View Article

Friday Facts: June 3, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.  Also on June 6, Dr. Greene’s 9:30-10:45 a.m. lecture, “The Foolishness of Trying to Regulate Our Way to School Improvement,” is open to the public. Burruss Building, Room 151. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, 358,333 Georgians were on welfare (AFDC), compared… View Article

Urban Farms: Unlikely Oases in Food Deserts

By Harold Brown Harold Brown “Food desert” is the modern urban description of a supposed area of hunger amid plenty. But one would expect emaciation in a food desert, not obesity, which is caused by overconsumption and bad choices. The modern urban version is a social-cultural food desert. When these occur, they are likely caused by economic, social or regulatory rules. Food vendors go where the demand is, if local regulations allow.  Walmart withdrew its 2011 application for a store, including a supermarket, in downtown Athens, Ga., because of protests against this “urban curse”. The property is now being developed as mostly apartment/condominium units – no supermarket. This week, the Jackson (Ga.) Herald website reported Walmart has withdrawn its rezoning… View Article

The Foundation raises issues of importance above political rhetoric to a point where politicians focus on them and ultimately make quality decisions.

U.S. Representative Johnny Isakson more quotes