Tag: Georgia Public Policy Foundation

Friday Facts: April 29, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, state government operated a tourist train, hotels, conference centers, golf courses and water parks, which caused us to ask in a commentary, “Can Russia Teach Georgia About Free Enterprise?” Quotes of Note “I applaud Georgia, and Governor Nathan Deal, for demonstrating that making our criminal justice system more fair is a bipartisan idea. Georgia’s latest reform bill touches on school discipline, correctional education for youth, the accuracy of criminal records, fees and fines, and occupational licensing. From the community to the cell block to the courtroom, this bill will both enhance justice and promote safety, serving as an example for the nation.” – President View Article

Friday Facts: April 15, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and now: Savannah’s iconic Talmadge Bridge was opened in 1991, the year the Foundation was established. Then and Now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, Savannah’s new Talmadge Bridge opened to traffic, with a vertical clearance of 185 feet at high tide. The Savannah harbor deepening project under way will increase the channel’s depth from 42 feet to 47 feet to accommodate larger ships at what is now the nation’s fourth-busiest container port. Quotes of Note  “It is not and cannot become a crime to disagree with a government official. Somewhere along the line, dissent from orthodoxy has transformed from a uniquely American virtue to a crime.” – Kent Lassman “When… View Article

Friday Facts: April 8, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, metro Atlanta’s peak-hour congestion delays averaged 35 hours per commuter and the cost averaged $725. By 2014 (latest data) the cost was $1,130 per commuter for 52 hours of delay annually. The good news? The number of commuters increased 66 percent, the cost of delay grew 55 percent but congestion increased “only” 49 percent. We’re making a dent! Source: Texas Transportation Institute  Quotes of Note  “The property which every man has in his own labor, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable. The patrimony of a poor man lies in the strength… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Georgia and the rest of the country are experiencing a significant demographic change: We’re seeing more grandparents and children, with fewer folks in between. The Census Bureau projects that Georgia’s elderly population will nearly double between 2010 and 2030. Meanwhile, the number of children ages 5-17 is predicted to rise by 26 percent. This shift will place a serious strain on a decreasing percentage of working-age adults. Georgia has one of the most generous retirement exclusions for income tax purposes in the nation ($130,000 per couple) and, in many counties, those over 65 are exempted from school taxes. So Georgia’s anticipated 1 million-plus increase of retirement-age residents will be particularly significant as state and local… View Article

Checking Up On Health: March 29, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD The law and unintended consequences One of the pieces of legislation that passed in the Georgia General Assembly is known as the Honorable Jimmy Carter Cancer Treatment Access Act. It’s prefaced with the statement that, “on December 6, President Carter revealed that his physicians said that all signs of cancer were gone.” The former president, you may recall, was diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and it had spread to his brain and liver. He was 91 years old at diagnosis. He continues to undergo treatment; he says his doctors found no trace of the lesions. The legislation, HB 965, mandates: No health… View Article

Friday Facts: March 25, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, a 26-inch RCA color console TV would have cost $1,166.72 in today’s dollars. Today, $1,199 would buy you a 55-inch ultra-HD TV!  Quotes of Note  “All these smaller cities investing billions into rail had better hope their projections of massive benefits come true, because all too soon the rebuild bill will start coming due. If you don’t believe me, just ask Washington.” – Aaron M. Renn  “Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. We cannot endure the infamy and guilt… View Article
Benita Dodd wrote a commentary for ZPolitics that was published on March 23, 2016, the sixth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act. The article is published in its entirety below; read it online at http://zpolitics.com/six-reasons/. ObamaCare Turns 6 Today. Here are six reasons it why it needs to go.     By Benita Dodd Today (March 23) marks the sixth anniversary of passage of the 2010 Affordable Care Act that was implemented in 2014. In Georgia, there’s no end in sight to ObamaCare opposition. It’s fortunate. Georgia is among 27 states that left ObamaCare to the federally managed health care exchange, www.healthcare.gov.  About half the state-managed exchanges are struggling financially. Georgia is also among 20 states that chose not to View Article

Transit Funding a Step in the Right Direction

By Baruch Feigenbaum In 2015, the Georgia General Assembly passed the Transportation Funding Act, dedicating substantial existing resources from the general fund to state roadway funding. Unfortunately, the 2015 plan funded neither transit nor local roadways. In 2016, legislation introduced by Sen. Brandon Beach proposed increasing the sales tax in the city of Atlanta, DeKalb County and Fulton County by 0.50 cents to fund three rail expansions: Lindbergh Station to Emory, alongside S.R. 400 from North Springs Station to Windward Parkway and Indian Creek Station to Lithonia. While the Metropolitan Atlanta Regional Transportation Authority (MARTA) favored the rail expansion, some communities were not on board. Much of the opposition centered on North Fulton, where area leaders believed that improving… View Article

An Assault on Nonprofit Giving

This commentary by Jon Riches appeared March 18 in Philanthropy Daily and is republished below. Access the commentary online at http://www.philanthropydaily.com/an-assault-on-nonprofit-giving/. An Assault on Nonprofit Giving By Jon Riches Do you donate to the National Rifle Association, the Sierra Club, or your local art museum? If so, you may soon be required to report your name, address, and contribution amounts to the government. Couched as “transparency” measures, a wave of regulatory action, legislative proposals, and ballot measures are aimed at eliminating, or significantly curtailing, private charitable giving. The first line of attack on donor privacy has come from partisan regulators. Attorneys General in both New York and California have been notifying nonprofit organizations that they must disclose private tax… View Article

CPA, Readers Hail Georgia Tax Reform Plan

The Senate voted along party lines March 16 on tax reform for Georgia. The Foundation has received numerous compliments after Kelly McCutchen’s March 18 commentary about the state tax reform legislation that passed the Senate March 16. One comment came from CPA Jeff Kellar: With Florida and Tennessee not having an individual income tax, and Alabama’s rate of 5 percent, Georgia should continue to move in a more competitive direction.  One additional measure the state could employ to assist and encourage small business, would be to eliminate the Net Worth Tax on small business corporations. (Tennessee imposes a “Hall” tax on certain interest and dividend income). Georgia’s legislation, HB 238, would in fact eliminate the Net Worth Tax.   Kellar,  … View Article

Thank you for what you are doing to lead the nation. The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is leading the way. This is truly one of the leading lights in the state think tank movement. Excellent ideas. It’s well run. For those of you who are donors I congratulate you on your wisdom and I encourage you to do it and do it more.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2015) more quotes