Tag: Georgia policy

Checking Up On Health: August 17, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd   I visited Canada briefly over the weekend, driving into Windsor, Ontario, from Detroit. Did you know? The first eatery visible after you cross the Ambassador Bridge into Canada is a McDonald’s; the second is a Popeye’s! What was really interesting, however, was the proliferation of pharmacies in Windsor. I assume — I can’t vouch for it — that it’s as a convenience for U.S. citizens who want to zip over there to purchase Canada’s lower-priced prescription drugs. That began a discussion in the car about why Canada drugs are cheaper: lower prices because of the government’s buying power there as opposed to private negotiations in the United States, fewer choices… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd August marks the 20th anniversary of the transformative Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act. This bipartisan welfare reform legislation signed by President Bill Clinton on August 22, 1996, dramatically transformed the nation’s welfare system, implementing strong welfare-to-work requirements and incentivizing states to transition welfare recipients into work. The law, which created Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and replaced the 61-year-old Aid to Families with Dependent Children, also implemented stricter food stamp regulations. Those included time limits for some recipients and a lifetime ban for drug felons, which states could opt out of. (Wisely, Georgia finally opted out this year, with Gov. Nathan Deal signing criminal justice reform legislation that allows drug felons to receive food… View Article
EVENT INVITATION August 2, 2016 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Aug: 22 Event: ‘Across the Pond: A Policy Update,’ With U.K. Consul General Jeremy Pilmore-Bedford           Atlanta – What’s the meaning of life for the United Kingdom after “Brexit?” On June 23, Britain held a referendum on whether to remain part of the 28-member European Union. The vote was 51.9 percent in favor of leaving. The exit from the EU will take a while, but the country’s leadership change was almost immediate. What do the changes mean for Britain? What does this mean for relationships between that nation and ours? Specifically, how will the changes affect Georgia? According to the Georgia Department of Economic Development, Georgia is the fourth-largest… View Article

Don’t Buy Tax-Free Weekends

By Scott Drenkard and Joseph Henchman Sales tax holidays are periods of time when selected goods are exempted from state (and sometimes local) sales taxes. Such holidays have become an annual event in many states, with exemptions for such targeted products as back-to-school supplies, clothing, computers, hurricane preparedness supplies, products bearing the U.S. government’s Energy Star label, and even guns. In 2016, 17 states will conduct sales tax holidays, down from a peak of 19 states in 2010. Georgia’s back-to-school sales tax holiday takes place July 30-31; the two-day holiday is expected to “save” Georgians up to $74.5 million. The list of tax-exempt items is here.  It includes clothing and footwear costing $100 or less, school supplies costing… View Article

Friday Facts: July 29, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the Georgia Dome was under construction. When completed in 1992 at a cost of $214 million ($361 million in 2016 dollars), it was one of the largest state-funded construction projects in state history. Twenty-five years later, it’s scheduled for demolition. The $1.6 billion Mercedes Benz football stadium under construction gets at least $200 million (and by some estimates, up to $600 million) in public subsidies.  Follow us! This week the Foundation hit a milestone: 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,650 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: What policies should… View Article
By Benita Dodd The media hype surrounding the political parties’ national conventions spotlights the enormous discord created by personalities and politics as the presidential election approaches. Getting short shrift amid slogans and the scramble for dollars and votes are the policy proposals that will affect the lives of Americans — and Georgians — long after November 8. Many citizens dismiss the states’ impact on issues at the national level — federal taxes, immigration, the military and education policy, for example. Too many believe the answers depend on who is elected president and to Congress. It’s not always so. It behooves Georgians to pay close attention to innovative ideas closer to home. States are often incubators, testing life-enhancing policies that can… View Article

Friday Facts: July 22, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we polled Georgia voters on the state’s budget and economy. “Among the changes they strongly support are: privatization, spending cuts and limits, term limitations, creation of strict ethics laws and creation of direct citizen initiative and referendum.” Twenty-five years later, we continue to work diligently on the fiscal issues important to Georgians. Follow us! The Foundation is almost at 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,644 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: What policies should Georgia adopt on education? Find out the Foundation’s proposals for Georgia’s children. Learn more about… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION NEWS RELEASE July 21, 2016 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Attorney Ross Coker Joins Georgia Public Policy Foundation Atlanta – The Georgia Public Policy Foundation, Georgia’s only free-market, state-focused public policy research organization, is pleased to announce the addition of Ross Coker as Research and Outreach Director. Coker earned his B.A. in political science at Auburn University and his law degree at Pepperdine University School of Law. He is a member of the State Bar of California and practiced in Washington, D.C., before joining the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. Coker’s primary focus is the Foundation’s Criminal Justice Initiative. “The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has a proud history of championing criminal justice reform since our… View Article

Climate Change Déjà Vu

By Harold Brown This week in the U.S. Senate, Democrats took to the floor to attack national and state organizations that oppose their climate policies in what they called a “Web of Denial.” The Georgia Public Policy Foundation was among 22 signatories to a letter that denounced Democrats’ attack on free speech.   But what about the so-called Web of Denial?   Global warming is not new. In the middle of the 20th century, climate predictions, patterns and clues were similar to what we hear today, though not as loud and frequent. A Saturday Evening Post headline asked in 1950, “Is the World Getting Warmer? The article reported the first January melting ever of an ice bridge in 1948-1950 that… View Article

Friday Facts: July 15, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we urged in the LaGrange Daily News: “We must free parents to choose the school their child will attend. It should be obvious that parents, not government, know what is best for their children.” Twenty-five years later, resistance to school choice continues. Follow us! The Foundation is just eight shy of 3,000 Facebook “likes!” Our Twitter account has 1,641 followers at twitter.com/gppf. Follow us on Instagram, too! Guide to the Issues 2016: Find out what the Foundation proposes on issues such as transportation, health care, education, taxes and more. Currently available online, each chapter includes principles for reform, facts… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is a driving force for market-based solutions to policy challenges. The work done by this outstanding organization is making a real impact on the future of Georgia. I personally consider the Foundation a primary source for policy ideas. All Georgians are better off because the Foundation is helping lead the critical policy debates in our state.

Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers more quotes