Tag: Georgia Department of Education

Teachers Unions, Faulty Economics and School Choice

By Jeffrey Dorfman JEFFREY DORFMAN School choice is one of the most controversial and hard-fought public policy debates of the past few decades. Most liberals, who get significant funding from public school teachers unions, line up against any form of school choice, while many conservatives favor allowing some form of market to introduce competition amongst schools for education tax dollars. The argument against school choice always seems to focus on how it would “defund” public schools by “draining” monies away. This argument, however, is based on faulty economics and should be discarded or strongly rebutted by school choice proponents. School choice comes in a variety of flavors. Some public school districts let residents choose their preferred school within the district;… View Article

U.S. News & World Report Publishes on Education Funding

The September 20, 2016, edition of U.S. News & World Report published, “More Money, Same Problems,” an article by Georgia Public Policy Foundation Senior Felow Ben Scafidi and American Enterprise Institute Resident Fellow Gerard Robinson. The article is posted in full below; the link to the article is hereMore Money, Same Problems Showering public schools with funds has been a costly failure. Why not try something new? By Gerard Robinson and Benjamin Scafidi Public education is important to the economic and social well-being of our nation, which is why it is the No. 1 line item in 41 state budgets. Today, more than 50 million students attend America’s public schools. Some students are succeeding: They graduate… View Article

Georgia at the Intersection of Education and Aging

By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Georgia and the rest of the country are experiencing a significant demographic change: We’re seeing more grandparents and children, with fewer folks in between. The Census Bureau projects that Georgia’s elderly population will nearly double between 2010 and 2030. Meanwhile, the number of children ages 5-17 is predicted to rise by 26 percent. This shift will place a serious strain on a decreasing percentage of working-age adults. Georgia has one of the most generous retirement exclusions for income tax purposes in the nation ($130,000 per couple) and, in many counties, those over 65 are exempted from school taxes. So Georgia’s anticipated 1 million-plus increase of retirement-age residents will be particularly significant as state and local… View Article

At the Intersection of Education and Aging

Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Thursday, March 10, 2016. Hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, the event speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor for the Foundation for Excellence in Education.  Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Dr. Matthew Ladner is the Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. He has written numerous studies on school choice, charter schools and special education reform… View Article
Kenneth Artz of the Heartland Institute interviewed Foundation Senior Fellow Ben Scafidi on  the Georgia Education Reform Commission’s recommendations. The article is below; access the article on Heartrland’s Web site here: http://news.heartland.org/newspaper-article/2016/02/10/georgia-commission-releases-reform-recommendations Georgia Commission Releases Reform Recommendations By Kenneth Artz A Georgia government commission released a report in December 2015 detailing recommended reforms lawmakers should consider during the recently convened legislative session. The commission called on the state’s legislature to fund charter schools in a more equitable manner and provide more support for districts wishing to explore tying teachers’ pay to student performance. The commission was composed of private-sector leaders, local and state education officials, and lawmakers. The stated goal of the Georgia Education Reform Commission is to “[provide]… View Article
Everyone likes rankings, and one of the most frequent questions we receive is about where Georgia ranks in terms of K-12 spending and achievement. Georgia’s spending per student is higher than all but one of its neighboring states, according to the most recent data. In terms of student achievement, adjusting for demographic factors that schools can’t control, Georgia ranks 19th highest in the nation. (An analysis of how Georgia compares based on unadjusted NAEP scores is available here.) Clearly, spending doesn’t equal performance, at least not in 2013. The states in Table 1 are listed in order of spending, but their academic achievement varies dramatically. Georgia ranks much higher than most would guess at 19, but Florida (#4) and… View Article

Solving the Failure of Education Desegregation

By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Education desegregation started out with such lofty promise in America. So why have decades of massive government efforts to mandate integration in schools and encourage racial diversity produced such dismal results? In his latest study, Dr. Ben Scafidi, Senior Fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, set out to examine why schools continue to be segregated and how to overcome this. He found that neighborhoods and schools both moved toward racial integration in the 1960s and ‘70s, but in the 1980s segregation began returning to public schools even as neighborhood integration continued. Public school integration reversed at the same time neighborhood segregation by income increased, according to… View Article

Correcting Misinformation on School Choice

This blog post by Martin Lueken was published by EducationNext at http://educationnext.org/correcting-misinformation-on-school-choice/. By Martin Lueken In an opinion piece in the Nonprofit Quarterly with the title “What Wisconsin and Arizona Should Teach Us About School Vouchers,” Martin Levine recycles several claims commonly trumpeted by school choice opponents – but without any evidence or appropriate context. Mr. Levine ignores the ample evidence available that school choice provides benefits for children. This does a disservice to the thousands of children and families who have benefited from school choice over the last couple decades. Let’s first begin with Mr. Levine’s claim of “little evidence of improved educational outcomes from those students who these programs have assisted.” Though a frequent talking… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION NEWS RELEASE July 20, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation Hosts Friedman Legacy Day in Savannah July 29 Join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, Georgia’s only free-market, state-focused public policy research organization, at the annual Friedman Legacy for Freedom Day in Georgia’s First City on July 29: a Policy Briefing Luncheon at Vic’s On the River in Savannah. This event, sponsored by the Georgia Charter Schools Association and the Friedman Foundation, celebrates the birthday of Nobel Prize winner and school choice chamption Milton Friedman. Dr. Benjamin Scafidi, Georgia’s foremost education expert, will keynote the event, providing a preview of education issues at the Legislature and a review of the legacy of Milton Friedman.… View Article

A Reality Check on the School Choice Bogeymen

By Benjamin Scafidi BENJAMIN SCAFIDI Two bills in the Georgia Legislature would allow thousands of Georgia parents the opportunity to choose better educational options for their children. One, (HB 35) would significantly increase the cap of $58 million on contributions to Georgia’s tax credit scholarship program. This program allows taxpayers to donate a portion of their state income tax liability to Student Scholarship Organizations (SSOs) that give scholarships to children to attend private schools. With the popularity of the program (based on two recent opinion polls), it’s no surprise the $58 million cap on donations for 2015 was met on Day 1, January 1. For reference, that $58 million is about three-tenths of 1 percent of what taxpayers spend… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is a driving force for market-based solutions to policy challenges. The work done by this outstanding organization is making a real impact on the future of Georgia. I personally consider the Foundation a primary source for policy ideas. All Georgians are better off because the Foundation is helping lead the critical policy debates in our state.

Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers more quotes