Tag: Georgia Charter Schools Commission

Legislature 2017 Misses Many Opportunities

By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Last year, we wrote that the General Assembly is often, and appropriately, chided for passing last-minute bills with little debate or study. Once again this year, major legislation was crammed into the waning hours of the last day of the session. It was as ugly as the North Carolina-Gonzaga championship game. Several bills were hurriedly voted on after midnight; many legislators seemed more focused on tearing up papers for confetti in anticipation of Sine Die instead of studying the bills. Sadly, a major reform of adoption law, an income tax rate cut for Georgians and a minor expansion of school choice fell victim to the clock. Legislators wisely passed the 2018 budget before March 30,… View Article

Teachers Unions, Faulty Economics and School Choice

By Jeffrey Dorfman JEFFREY DORFMAN School choice is one of the most controversial and hard-fought public policy debates of the past few decades. Most liberals, who get significant funding from public school teachers unions, line up against any form of school choice, while many conservatives favor allowing some form of market to introduce competition amongst schools for education tax dollars. The argument against school choice always seems to focus on how it would “defund” public schools by “draining” monies away. This argument, however, is based on faulty economics and should be discarded or strongly rebutted by school choice proponents. School choice comes in a variety of flavors. Some public school districts let residents choose their preferred school within the district;… View Article

U.S. News & World Report Publishes on Education Funding

The September 20, 2016, edition of U.S. News & World Report published, “More Money, Same Problems,” an article by Georgia Public Policy Foundation Senior Felow Ben Scafidi and American Enterprise Institute Resident Fellow Gerard Robinson. The article is posted in full below; the link to the article is hereMore Money, Same Problems Showering public schools with funds has been a costly failure. Why not try something new? By Gerard Robinson and Benjamin Scafidi Public education is important to the economic and social well-being of our nation, which is why it is the No. 1 line item in 41 state budgets. Today, more than 50 million students attend America’s public schools. Some students are succeeding: They graduate… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Georgia and the rest of the country are experiencing a significant demographic change: We’re seeing more grandparents and children, with fewer folks in between. The Census Bureau projects that Georgia’s elderly population will nearly double between 2010 and 2030. Meanwhile, the number of children ages 5-17 is predicted to rise by 26 percent. This shift will place a serious strain on a decreasing percentage of working-age adults. Georgia has one of the most generous retirement exclusions for income tax purposes in the nation ($130,000 per couple) and, in many counties, those over 65 are exempted from school taxes. So Georgia’s anticipated 1 million-plus increase of retirement-age residents will be particularly significant as state and local… View Article

At the Intersection of Education and Aging

Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Thursday, March 10, 2016. Hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, the event speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor for the Foundation for Excellence in Education.  Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Dr. Matthew Ladner is the Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. He has written numerous studies on school choice, charter schools and special education reform… View Article
NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release February 17, 2016  Contact: Benita Dodd benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org or 404-256-4050 March 10 Event: ‘At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging’ Atlanta – Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Thursday, March 10, 2016, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Ladner has written… View Article

Five Reasons for Education Optimism in Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd  BENITA DODD Georgians marked National School Choice Week Jan. 24-30, a week of events highlighted by thousands of yellow “woobie” scarves and celebration of the innovations in education in Georgia. Among the more than 16,000 events held around the nation was the Foundation’s January 27 Leadership Breakfast, a panel discussion with legislators Hunter Hill and Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis. The event was followed by a massive noon rally at the Georgia State Capitol. Championing choice with one voice at the rally were Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, rapper Ludacris and an all-grown-up Keisha Knight Pulliam, who you may recall as The Cosby Show’s Rudy Huxtable. All week, the enthusiasm for school choice was overwhelming… View Article

Solving the Failure of Education Desegregation

By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Education desegregation started out with such lofty promise in America. So why have decades of massive government efforts to mandate integration in schools and encourage racial diversity produced such dismal results? In his latest study, Dr. Ben Scafidi, Senior Fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, set out to examine why schools continue to be segregated and how to overcome this. He found that neighborhoods and schools both moved toward racial integration in the 1960s and ‘70s, but in the 1980s segregation began returning to public schools even as neighborhood integration continued. Public school integration reversed at the same time neighborhood segregation by income increased, according to… View Article

The Case for K-12 Student-Based Budgeting in Georgia

EVENT INVITATION October 13, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Atlanta – Join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, the Reason Foundation and Allovue on Tuesday, December 8, 2015, at the Cobb Galleria’s Centre’s Gallery Room for, “The Case for K-12 Student-Based Budgeting in Georgia,” a School Finance Reform Summit to look at the possibilities in student-based budgeting for Georgia. Registration for this event, which is open to the public, is $30. Register here. Program 10:30 a.m. – Welcome Kelly McCutchen, President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation 10:40 a.m. – Student-Based Budgeting 101 and the Role of Technology in Education Finance Aaron Smith, Education Policy Analyst, Reason Foundation Jess Gartner, Founder & CEO, Allovue Jason View Article
EVENT INVITATION October 20, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org The Case for K-12 Student-Based Budgeting in Georgia Atlanta – The recommendations from the funding committee of Georgia Governor Deal’s Education Reform Commission, which were expected in August, have been delayed until December 18. That means, according to news reports, a postponement of least one year – until summer 2017 – in implementing any new education funding model for Georgia. Reform is past due: Georgia’s Quality Basic Education (QBE) funding formula has stagnated since 1985 while the education landscape has transformed around it. Today, more than one dollar in every three of Georgia’s state budget is allocated to K-12 education.  Just how does Georgia ensure that funding follows… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been doing important work for the free enterprise movement for the past 20 years.  I can assure you from the vantage of a non-profit think tank in Washington, D.C. with much the same principles as GPPF that the work we do simply would not be possible if it were not for the important work that GPPF does.  We see it, we understand it, it is an inspiration to us, it is the kind of thing that will translate into the important work that we can do in Washington, D.C.  We thank you very much for that.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2011) more quotes