Tag: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice

By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia lawmakers filed about five dozen public education bills in this year’s General Assembly, bills that address funding formulas, enhancements to parental school choice, tax credits, ideas to preserve HOPE financial aid, additional days for pre-K education programs and many more. Here is something lawmakers might want to think about:  Why was the employment growth rate for Georgia public school administrators and non-teaching staff nearly double the percentage growth rate in total student population between 1992 and 2009, at enormous real cost?  Also, why does Georgia employ more administrators and non-teaching staff than teachers? This data is found in “The School Staffing Surge,” a new report from the Friedman Foundation for… View Article

Have U.S. Schools Become Just Another Jobs Program?

(This article was written for the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice.  The author is a Friedman Fellow.  The chart below shows how 1992 – 2009 Georgia public school personnel growth for teachers and all other personnel far exceeded student population growth.) By Benjamin Scafidi Benjamin Scafidi, Professor of Economics, Georgia College and State University America’s K-12 public education system has experienced tremendous historical growth in employment, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics. Between fiscal year (FY) 1950 and FY 2009, the number of K-12 public school students in the United States increased by 96 percent while the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) school employees grew 386 percent. Public schools grew staffing at a rate… View Article
By Mike Klein This summer and fall you will repeatedly hear that approving a charter schools constitutional amendment would steal resources from traditional Georgia public schools.  The idea is that when any money follows a student to a charter school the students left behind somehow suffer. This argument seems to apply only when students move to charter schools.  You never hear public school systems, their superintendents or school board members complain when students move from one public school system to another.  Apparently financial harm is a one-way street. The premise that students moving to charter schools will cause financial quakes in traditional school systems also suggests we should accept another premise that public school systems are so inflexible they cannot… View Article

…One of the best things about the Georgia Public Policy Foundation is that it has such a broad membership base.

Dr. Wendy L. Gramm, Former Chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission more quotes