Tag: Events

Friday Facts: June 3, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here.  Also on June 6, Dr. Greene’s 9:30-10:45 a.m. lecture, “The Foolishness of Trying to Regulate Our Way to School Improvement,” is open to the public. Burruss Building, Room 151. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, 358,333 Georgians were on welfare (AFDC), compared… View Article

Friday Facts: May 27, 2016

It’s Friday! Events  Monday, June 6: “The Politics of School Choice” is a Leadership Breakfast keynoted by national education expert Jay Greene and sponsored by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Education Economics Center at Kennesaw State University. 7:30 a.m., Room 278, Burruss Building, Kennesaw State University. Parking available in the visitors’ lot. $20 includes event and Chick-fil-A breakfast. Register online here. Then and Now: In 1991, when the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, we reported the percentage of education dollars used for classroom instruction had gone from 76 percent in 1970 to 52 percent in 1990. Today, instruction spending is 54-58 percent (depending on how broadly “instruction” is defined.) Meanwhile, from… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Georgia and the rest of the country are experiencing a significant demographic change: We’re seeing more grandparents and children, with fewer folks in between. The Census Bureau projects that Georgia’s elderly population will nearly double between 2010 and 2030. Meanwhile, the number of children ages 5-17 is predicted to rise by 26 percent. This shift will place a serious strain on a decreasing percentage of working-age adults. Georgia has one of the most generous retirement exclusions for income tax purposes in the nation ($130,000 per couple) and, in many counties, those over 65 are exempted from school taxes. So Georgia’s anticipated 1 million-plus increase of retirement-age residents will be particularly significant as state and local… View Article

Friday Facts: March 11, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, there were no charter schools in Georgia. The public charter school law was signed in 1994 and the state’s first three charter schools opened in 1995. Today, according to the Georgia Department of Education, Georgia has 110 charter schools, including are 80 start-up charter schools and 30 conversion charter schools, as well as 14 charter systems in Georgia that include 107 schools.  Quotes of Note  “Instead of car-free cities, we are on the threshold of another mobility revolution that will make cars more common than ever: the self-driving car. Among other things, self-driving cars will change where we live and almost completely… View Article

Criminal Justice Reform Unshackles Georgians

By Benita M. Dodd Appeals Court Judge Michael P. Boggs, co-chair of the Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform since 2012, makes a passionate case for the strides that have taken Georgia to the forefront in criminal justice reform. The Waycross jurist recalls presiding over a drug court in six rural counties in South Georgia. “I asked defendants three questions,” Boggs told the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s annual Legislative Luncheon recently. “When did you first drop out of school? Ninth grade. “What drug did you first start using? Marijuana. “When did you first start using it? Age 13. Boggs asked the luncheon attendees to guess: “How many of the first 6,000 criminal defendants I dealt with in felony criminal court… View Article

At the Intersection of Education and Aging

Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Thursday, March 10, 2016. Hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, the event speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor for the Foundation for Excellence in Education.  Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Dr. Matthew Ladner is the Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. He has written numerous studies on school choice, charter schools and special education reform… View Article

Friday Facts: February 26, 2016

It’s Friday!  Honors: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation was honored with a Senate Resolution Tuesday to mark 25 years of serving Georgia with ideas for limited-government, free-market solutions and promoting “policy over politics.” Accepting the honor in the Senate chamber on behalf of the Foundation were two former presidents of the Foundation, Griff Doyle (1993-97) and T. Rogers Wade (1997-2010), who is also Board Chairman; current President Kelly McCutchen (2011-present) and Vice President Benita Dodd (2003-present). View the video here.  The Georgia State Senate passed a resolution commending the Foundation for 25 years of service to Georgia. Then and now: In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the average cost of a gallon View Article
NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release February 17, 2016  Contact: Benita Dodd benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org or 404-256-4050 March 10 Event: ‘At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging’ Atlanta – Registration is open for, “At the Inter$ection of Education and Aging,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Thursday, March 10, 2016, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The speaker is Dr. Matt Ladner, Senior Advisor of Policy and Research for the Foundation for Excellence in Education. Ladner will unveil his original research and analysis on the demographic challenges facing state education budgets, including Georgia’s, and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford. Ladner has written… View Article
The Marietta Daily Journal quotes Foundation President Kelly McCutchen in a January 31 article about the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast celebrating National School Choice Week. The text is below; access the article online here. State senators speak out on alternatives to public school By Jon Gargis Celebrating National School Choice Week at the Foundation’s event Wednesday are (from left) Foundation President Kelly McCutchen, education innovator Mike Davis, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and State Sen. Hunter Hill. CUMBERLAND — Hours before a downtown Atlanta rally focused on school choice, state Sen. Hunter Hill, R-Smyrna, and Georgia Public Policy Foundation officials were among those who spoke of alternatives to public school education and the way the state funds it. “If you’re concerned… View Article

Friday Facts: January 29, 2016

It’s Friday!  Celebrating National School Choice Week at the Foundation’s event Wednesday are (from left) Foundation President Kelly McCutchen, education innovator Mike Davis, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and State Sen. Hunter Hill. Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, there were 7.5 million cellphone users across the nation. One year later, the number surpassed 10 million and the first commercial text message was sent. This year, smartphone users in the United States are expected to surpass 207.2 million; by 2015, text messages were at 169.3 billion a year in the United States! It’s why we’ll be launching our new Web site soon!  Events February 17: Register now… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been doing important work for the free enterprise movement for the past 20 years.  I can assure you from the vantage of a non-profit think tank in Washington, D.C. with much the same principles as GPPF that the work we do simply would not be possible if it were not for the important work that GPPF does.  We see it, we understand it, it is an inspiration to us, it is the kind of thing that will translate into the important work that we can do in Washington, D.C.  We thank you very much for that.

Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2011) more quotes