Tag: Education

Powered Up at Home but Powered Down in the Classroom

(Editor’s Note: Rick Ogston is the founder of Carpe Diem Schools in Yuma, Arizona.  Ogston will discuss education innovation at the 2012 Georgia Public Policy Forum on Friday, September 21 at the W Hotel in midtown Atlanta.  Click here for additional conference information.) By Rick Ogston Rick Ogston, Founder and CEO, Carpe Diem Schools Carpe Diem was created out of my own frustration.   I had what I call an Ichabod Crane moment.  Walking through my school I was looking through the windows and walking into the classrooms and I noticed a lot of disengagement, not just students but also teachers.  I was a bit challenged by that and I was thinking we’ve got to do something about that.  Why are… View Article

Drilling Down on Learning Tech and Who Pays For It

By Eric Wearne “For state and district leaders, it comes down to two decisions: what devices and who pays.”  These are always fundamental concepts surrounding the adoption and implementation of school technology.  A new paper by Digital Learning Now! attempts to address both. Eric Wearne, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation According to its website, Digital Learning Now! is “a national campaign to advance policies that will create a high quality digital learning environment to better prepare students with the knowledge and skills to succeed in college and careers.”  Convened in 2010, and currently co-chaired by former West Virginia Governor Bob Wise and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, last week DLN released the first installment in its “Smart Series,” which… View Article
Eric Wearne, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Eric Wearne Last fall, then-new Coahulla Creek High School in Whitfield County made a bold move and issued all of its students tablets rather than textbooks.  Now a new report by Learning Untethered titled “Learning is Personal,” noted by Getting Smart, takes a closer look at how tablets are actually used in some 5th grade classrooms over the course of a school year.  This is a “project,” rather than a full research paper, but it is a project schools might want to take note of.   The questions the authors asked were “whether handheld and tablet form factors are adequate for student production of content, or just consumption, and… View Article

Friday Facts: August 17, 2012

August 17, 2012 It’s Friday! Visit the Foundation’s new Web site at www.georgiapolicy.org then e-mail us at info@georgiapolicy.org to tell us what you think of it! Quotes of note “If Congress can do whatever in their discretion can be done by money, the Government is no longer a limited one, possessing enumerated powers, but an indefinite one, subject to particular exceptions.” – James Madison Events August 25: Join me a week from Saturday (August 25) at the E3 Summit in Kennesaw hosted by Americans For Prosperity Georgia. The conference will focus on the “3 E’s” driving Georgia’s future – economic freedom, educational choice and energy freedom. I will be on a panel discussing education reform, but the real stars include… View Article

Charter School Successes Well Documented

By Jay P. Greene Jay Greene, Adjunct Scholar, Georgia Public Policy Foundation According to the Global Report Card, more than a third of the 30 school districts with the highest math achievement in the United States are actually charter schools. This is particularly impressive considering that charters constitute about 5 percent of all schools and about 3 percent of all public school students. And it is even more amazing considering that some of the highest performing charter schools, like Roxbury Prep in Boston or KIPP Infinity in New York City, serve very disadvantaged students. As impressive and amazing as these results by charter schools may be, it would be wrong to conclude from this that charter schools… View Article

Friday Facts

      It’s Friday!   Quotes of note – “A government with the policy to rob Peter to pay Paul can be assured of the support of Paul.” – George Bernard Shaw – “Figures often beguile me, particularly when I have the arranging of them myself; in which case the remark attributed to Disraeli would often apply with justice and force: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.” – Mark Twain – “A general State education is a mere contrivance for molding people to be exactly like one another; and as the mold in which it casts them is that which pleases the dominant power in the government … in proportion as it is efficient and… View Article
By Eric Wearne Eric Wearne, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation The New Teacher Project (TNTP) is a national organization that “works with schools, districts and states to provide excellent teachers to the students who need them most and advance policies and practices that ensure effective teaching in every classroom.” TNTP recently published a report called “The Irreplaceables,” which discusses the “real retention crisis in America’s urban schools.”*  For the purposes of this report, TNTP defines “Irreplaceables” by looking at the value-added test data provided by four large urban school systems. Those whose students gained 5-6 more months of learning each year compared to lower-performing teachers were deemed “Irreplaceable” – about 20 percent of the teachers in each… View Article
By Eric Wearne Eric Wearne, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Each year the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) and the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) announce results for tests that make up the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).  This week, results of 2009 school year science tests in grades four, eight, and 12 were announced in a report titled “Science in Action.”  This announcement was different because for the first time results include assessments of interactive computer tasks (ICTs). The results include both hands-on and interactive computer tasks.  Students have been doing hands-on activities on NAEP science tests since the 1990s. A video describing the hands-on tasks is here.  In these tasks, students receive… View Article

Can Online Learning and Common Core Co-Exist?

By Eric Wearne Eric Wearne, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Recently I spoke at Georgia State University’s NET-Q Summer Institute, which focused on several aspects of the Common Core State Standards.  During the various breakout sessions, my co-panelists and I discussed several topics around the creation of the Common Core, including its practical impact on stakeholders, the use of assessments, and other issues. One aspect that gets probably too little coverage is the possible effect of the Common Core on technology and online learning. The two concepts are different in kind: online learning is an approach or tactic, while the Common Core is a set of content standards.  Yet in some ways, online learning and the Common… View Article
By Eric Wearne Eric Wearne, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation A recent New York Times article called into question practices resulting from tuition tax credit programs around the country, including in Georgia.  That article spends a lot of column space discussing creationism and football when the discussion should really come down to two issues: Are needy students benefitting from the program, and is the program being administered appropriately? The clearly accessible (though self-reported) data available online show the answer to both questions, at least for some of Georgia’s leading Student Scholarship Organizations (SSOs) – including the state’s largest – is yes. The Arête Scholars Fund, for example, focuses explicitly on students with financial needs. In 2010-11 (the most… View Article

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State Representative Bob Irvin more quotes