Tag: Education

A comprehensive mathematical analysis of Georgia public school funding models has found local school systems that enroll nearly nine-out-of-ten public school students would experience increased resources when a student transfers to a new or existing state charter school.  This model is based on funding levels approved in 2012 by the Georgia General Assembly. Analyzing revenue and expenditures, Georgia Tech professor of economics Christine P. Ries based her calculations on the funding formula that would be used if voters approve Georgia Constitutional Amendment 1 on Tuesday, November 6.  Ries concluded that most of Georgia’s 180 local school systems enrolling 89 percent of all students statewide would gain rather than lose funds when students transfer to state charter schools. This analysis challenges… View Article

Friday Facts: November 2, 2012

November 2, 2012  It’s Friday!  As you take time to consider the organizations you will support before year’s end, we hope you’ll include us. Your support will help us grow our membership and continue the Friday Facts, the commentaries, the great events and our commitment to a better Georgia based on free markets, individual responsibility and the rule of law. The Foundation is supported by Georgians who, like you, want to see us, “Changing Georgia Policy, Changing Georgians’ Lives.” Your contribution is tax-deductible and greatly appreciated. To donate, please go to georgiapolicy.org/get-involved/donate/Quotes of Note “Human beings will generally exercise power when they can get it, and they will exercise it most undoubtedly in popular governments under pretense of… View Article

Think Hard About Education We Often Take For Granted

By Deloyce Dhoruba After my husband and I completed military service, we moved our family to Georgia from Fort Richardson, Alaska.  As service members we have seen public school systems all over the U.S. and in other countries as well. I grew up in Chicago and my husband in New Jersey and coming to Georgia, we were very disturbed about what we saw when it came to education. My husband and I are middle class.  We both work, we spend time in our children’s classrooms, and we always took the time to volunteer at their schools.  We have had two children in local public schools. Our 10-year-old daughter was part of the FOCUS Program for gifted students; our 17-year-old son… View Article

Creating the Vision for Savannah Classical Academy

By Barbara Grimm My journey through the relatively new world of public charter schools began when my first child was in the fifth grade in 1999 and I began to visit middle schools looking for the best placement for him. Schools and classrooms and their issues were not entirely foreign territory as my husband and I were both educators in the public school system.  We had a frame of reference. The neighborhood school was known for its lack of discipline and low academic expectations, and so, for us, having our son attend that school was out of the question.  My husband and I were aware of the lack of opportunities available for middle school students in Savannah. We were staunch… View Article
By Kelly Marlow Having grown up in metro Atlanta, a visit to the Gold Dome for PTA Day at the Capitol still held as much thrill for me as a Mother as it did when I was in school. As I walked the stone staircases in the winter of 2011, I was overwhelmed with youthful memories of school field trips and civic lessons. As the parent of second grade twins and also as my Cherokee County school’s PTA Board Member-Elect, I walked arm in arm with my fellow school leaders who shared a palpable sense of pride in our role as the drivers of meaningful parental involvement in our public schools.  I was convinced that in a small way, we… View Article
By Eric Wearne Recently, the state of Minnesota used a state statute to briefly ban online education.  The state’s Office of Higher Education (OHE) informed new online education startup Coursera that the company could no longer provide services in Minnesota because they had not been approved by the state.  According to a policy analyst at the OHE, “This has been a longtime requirement in Minnesota (at least 20 years) and applies to online and brick-and-mortar postsecondary institutions that offer instruction to Minnesota residents as part of our overall responsibility to provide consumer protection for students.”  Coursera’ s courses are all freely available on the internet, however, so no one would be “tricked” into spending money on them. (When pressed … View Article

Friday Facts: October 26, 2012

It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note “Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.” – Napoleon Bonaparte “Just tell them that their wildest dreams will come true if they vote for you.” – Napoleon Dynamite Events January 24, 2013: Just one week after attending the national Transportation Research Board’s annual meeting, Robert W. Poole will keynote, “Moving Georgia Ahead: What’s Coming Down the Pike,” an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast hosted by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Poole, a Senior Fellow at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, is a co-founder of the Reason Foundation and its director of transportation policy and Searle Freedom Trust Transportation Fellow. He will provide an update on… View Article

Have U.S. Schools Become Just Another Jobs Program?

(This article was written for the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice.  The author is a Friedman Fellow.  The chart below shows how 1992 – 2009 Georgia public school personnel growth for teachers and all other personnel far exceeded student population growth.) By Benjamin Scafidi America’s K-12 public education system has experienced tremendous historical growth in employment, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics. Between fiscal year (FY) 1950 and FY 2009, the number of K-12 public school students in the United States increased by 96 percent while the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) school employees grew 386 percent. Public schools grew staffing at a rate four times faster than the increase in students over that… View Article

Georgia Outspending North Carolina in Education

There is no question that many school systems are struggling financially and teachers have been hit by several years of furloughs, but it is also important to put our spending into context. You may have heard references to the $6 billion in “austerity cuts” to education that have accumulated since 2003. This is compared to the outdated QBE funding formula that was first put in place in 1985 and has not significantly changed in the last 27 years. North Carolina is a better real-world comparison with a similar population and similar demographics. This tells a far different story. On a per student basis, we have outspent North Carolina by $18 billion since 2003.  Despite spending $18 billion more, our graduation… View Article

What’s Next When the School Says it Cannot Help?

By Addie Price An option in education can make all the difference in the world. I didn’t know anything about charter schools before I applied for my daughter to attend a new charter school opening in our community about a year and a half ago. All I knew was that my daughter, who was incredibly bright – teachers had even said she was brilliant – was going into seventh grade in advanced classes but was reading on a second grade level because she has a form of dyslexia. Her teachers and school told me their hands were tied and they couldn’t give her any further reading assistance unless she was failing. In other words, she did not qualify for help. … View Article

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