Tag: Charter Schools

In the News

The Columbia County News-Times of Sunday, September 16, published a letter to the editor from Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd in response to the publisher’s column on charter schools: Editor: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation would like to congratulate the schools of the Columbia County school system for what publisher Barry L. Paschal describes as one of the “communities with the best schools” (column, Sept. 12). It’s commendable that your system’s faculty and staff are committed to providing students with an opportunity for academic excellence. Unfortunately, in many of Georgia’s school districts, parents are dissatisfied with the quality of their local school – or it does not meet their child’s needs – yet they have no affordable alternative. A public… View Article
The Washington Post reports that charter schools in the nation’s capital are being treated poorly despite their popularity and track recored of student achievement: While the District pours billions into rebuilding a city system that has more classroom space than it needs, parents are increasingly opting for charter schools. If trends continue, charter enrollment will surpass the traditional public school population before the end of the decade. Yet even as charters soar in popularity, D.C. officials have often relegated these schools to second-class status, maintaining funding policies and practices that bypass charters and steer extra money to the traditional city school system. Highlights: Of Washington’s 76,753 students, 31,562 (or 41 percent) are enrolled in charter schools. Charter schools posted… View Article

National PTA Supports Georgia Charter Policy

The National Parent Teacher Association has revamped its policy to make it clear that it supports giving entities other than local school boards the right to approve charter schools, according to Education Week.  The article points out that this position conflicts with the Georgia PTA’s position, but “Georgia PTA  officials declined to comment on their apparent break with the National PTA on the issue. ” National PTA President Betsy Landers called their attention to the deletion, and said her organization wanted to ensure that its support “extends to all authorizing bodies and public charter schools,” as long as they are held to high standards. Ms. Landers noted that almost 50 percent of public charter schools in operation today are… View Article

The Financial Impact of State Charter Schools

Questions and Answers about Charter Schools and the Proposed Constitutional Amendment What is the financial impact of the proposed constitutional amendment? The proposed constitutional amendment ensures state charter schools will not take local tax dollars from existing, traditional public school systems either directly or indirectly. The total funding for state charter schools will be lower than the average in all but two school systems in the state. FACT: The constitutional amendment addresses the direct use of local tax dollars by stating “no bonded indebtedness may be incurred nor a school tax levied for the support of special schools without the approval of the local board of education and a majority of the qualified voters voting thereon in each of the… View Article

Friday Facts: August 24, 2012

August 24, 2012  It’s Friday!  Quotes of Note  Correction: Two of the Quotes of Note in last week’s Friday Facts were incorrectly attributed to Benjamin Franklin and John Adams. Our apologies; as Abraham Lincoln said, “Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet!”  “I desire so to conduct the affairs of this administration that if at the end… I have lost every other friend on earth, I shall at least have one friend left, and that friend shall be down inside of me.” – Abraham Lincoln  “Posterity – you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.” – John Adams  “Under this republic the rewards… View Article

How Do Public Charter Schools Impact Minorities?

Questions and Answers about Charter Schools and the Proposed Constitutional Amendment How do charter schools impact minorities? Charter schools have significantly closed the achievement gaps between minority, low-income students and wealthier, non-minority students. In fact, research shows that minorities benefit more from attending charter schools than non-minorities. As a public school, not only is it against the law for any charter school to discriminate by race or ethnicity, but charter schools in Georgia disproportionately serve minority students overall and more than two-thirds of independent startup charter schools in Georgia enroll a larger percentage of minorities than their local school system. And considering that parents must make a conscious decision to place their children in a charter school, this is clearly… View Article

Public Charter Schools and Local Control

Questions and Answers about Charter Schools and the Proposed Constitutional Amendment Does the proposed constitutional amendment conflict with the concept of local control? Under the proposed constitutional amendment, the state simply authorizes a state charter school to exist. Not a single dime of ongoing public funding goes to a state charter school unless families choose to enroll their children. This puts parents in control, not the state. Parents are the ultimate form of local control. The authorization process is similar to accreditation, which is required for all public schools. However, unlike accreditation, which is performed by unelected, unaccountable, private organizations, the State Charter Schools Commission will be a public board, appointed by and held accountable to elected officials. The authorization… View Article

What Are Public Charter Schools?

Questions and Answers about Charter Schools and the Proposed Constitutional Amendment What are charter schools? All charter schools are public schools. A charter is simply a contract that gives public schools flexibility in return for being held accountable for improved student achievement. By law, all charter schools: Must accept all applicants as long as space is available (a public, random lottery is held to select students if more apply than available slots) Must abide by all health, safety and civil rights laws Must be audited each year by an independent auditor Must be governed by an independent, local, nonprofit board Must comply with all state standards, testing and accountability requirements Must not charge tuition of any kind May be closed… View Article

Friday Facts: August 17, 2012

August 17, 2012 It’s Friday! Visit the Foundation’s new Web site at www.georgiapolicy.org then e-mail us at info@georgiapolicy.org to tell us what you think of it! Quotes of note “If Congress can do whatever in their discretion can be done by money, the Government is no longer a limited one, possessing enumerated powers, but an indefinite one, subject to particular exceptions.” – James Madison Events August 25: Join me a week from Saturday (August 25) at the E3 Summit in Kennesaw hosted by Americans For Prosperity Georgia. The conference will focus on the “3 E’s” driving Georgia’s future – economic freedom, educational choice and energy freedom. I will be on a panel discussing education reform, but the real stars include… View Article

Charter School Successes Well Documented

By Jay P. Greene Jay Greene, Adjunct Scholar, Georgia Public Policy Foundation According to the Global Report Card, more than a third of the 30 school districts with the highest math achievement in the United States are actually charter schools. This is particularly impressive considering that charters constitute about 5 percent of all schools and about 3 percent of all public school students. And it is even more amazing considering that some of the highest performing charter schools, like Roxbury Prep in Boston or KIPP Infinity in New York City, serve very disadvantaged students. As impressive and amazing as these results by charter schools may be, it would be wrong to conclude from this that charter schools… View Article

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State Representative Bob Irvin more quotes