Tag: Benita M. Dodd

Technology Can Trump Tough Love

By Benita M. Dodd “It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones,” Calvin Coolidge wrote in 1910 to his father, a newly elected senator in Vermont. Coolidge, an advocate of limited government, wrote those words 13 years before becoming the 30th U.S. president in 1923. More than a century later, it seems politicians still need reminding of this imperative. We wrote recently about a proposed victims’ rights constitutional amendment that has had unintended consequences.  Feel-good and tough-love approaches are especially appealing in election years. This year is no exception. Candidates and legislators often woo voters with minimal regard for the cost or consequences of their proposals. Sometimes, efforts to legislate and regulate turn ordinary… View Article

Checking Up On Health: February 12

  Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd  N.C. says no to Medicaid expansion: North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory is backing a move by the Legislature to block the state from expanding its Medicaid program or participating in the state health insurance exchanges created by the Federal Affordable Care Act. In a news release today, McCrory made the point, “In light of recent Medicaid audits, the current system in North Carolina is broken and not ready to expand without great risk to the taxpayers and to the delivery of existing services to those in need. We must first fix and reform the current system.” The state will also… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Money is tight and physicians are in short supply in many Georgia counties, so innovation and ingenuity are the keys in dealing with health coverage mandates required under the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act commonly referred to as ObamaCare.  In January, State Public Health Commissioner Brenda Fitzgerald announced that she plans to roll out “telemedicine” carts in public health centers across the state. These centers already are wired for teleconferencing between physicians and patients, many of whom are in rural areas with no or limited access to the specialists congregating in urban areas. Adding cameras, computers and medical equipment would allow real-time, long-distance consultations and… View Article

Friday Facts: February 8, 2013

February 8, 2013  It’s Friday! February 19: The Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast at Cobb County’s Georgian Club, 8 a.m. on Tuesday, February 19, is keynoted by the Cato Institute’s Randal O’Toole. In “American Dream, American Nightmare,” he offers an explanation of the forces at play in the housing market in Georgia and in the nation, and how to rebuild the American Dream of homeownership. This event is open to the public and will cost $25 to attend. Find out more at http://tinyurl.com/avnapnh. Register by Friday, February 15, at http://tinyurl.com/7ldaqnk. Quotes of Note “This is our challenge. And this is why, here in this hall tonight — better than we’ve ever done before — we’ve got to quit… View Article

Checking Up On Health: October 2, 2012

  Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Health Policy Briefs Compiled by Benita M. Dodd “Presenteeism”? Sick workers cost the nation $576 billion in lost productivity every year, Joanne Sammer reports in Businessfinancemag.com, citing the non-profit Integrated Benefits Institute. There’s $117 billion for wage replacement, including incidental absence due to illness, workers’ compensation, short-term disability and long-term disability. There’s another $232 billion for medical and pharmacy costs, including workers’ compensation, employee group health medical treatments, employee group health pharmacy treatments. And there’s $227 billion in lost productivity from absence due to illness and presenteeism (being at work but not performing at the usual level because of illness or poor health). Wellness programs paying off for employers: View Article

License to Kill Business

By Benita M. Dodd Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation From a historic building on the banks of the Etowah River in Rome, Ga., Ed Watters and his co-workers design elaborate gardens and manage a successful landscape company with a staff of more than 60. Behind the serene décor of the Outdoor Living Studio, however, lurk onerous regulatory hoops that the company must jump through to do business. One of those hurdles is licensing. The Institute for Justice reports that Georgia is one of just 10 states that require landscape workers – known as landscape architects – to have an occupational license to work in Georgia. According to the Secretary of State’s Web site, applicants must pass… View Article

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