Tag: Benita Dodd

Five Reasons for Education Optimism in Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd  BENITA DODD Georgians marked National School Choice Week Jan. 24-30, a week of events highlighted by thousands of yellow “woobie” scarves and celebration of the innovations in education in Georgia. Among the more than 16,000 events held around the nation was the Foundation’s January 27 Leadership Breakfast, a panel discussion with legislators Hunter Hill and Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis. The event was followed by a massive noon rally at the Georgia State Capitol. Championing choice with one voice at the rally were Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, rapper Ludacris and an all-grown-up Keisha Knight Pulliam, who you may recall as The Cosby Show’s Rudy Huxtable. All week, the enthusiasm for school choice was overwhelming… View Article
A January 22, 2016 article by Dave Williams in The Atlanta Business Chronicle quotes Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd on the folly of rail expansion for metro Atlanta. The article is below; access the article online here. Market forces will power state’s new transportation plan By Dave Williams Toll lanes across the entire top end of the Perimeter and on Georgia 400 north to Atlanta’s far suburbs. Rebuilt interchanges at Interstate 285 and I-20 east and west of Atlanta. And new truck-only lanes on I-75 from Macon to McDonough. All are part of an ambitious $10 billion, 10-year transportation plan Gov. Nathan Deal announced Jan. 12. After some initial experiments, the plan’s unprecedented scope shows theGeorgia Department of View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 26, 2016

Health Care News and Views Compiled by Benita Dodd Happy New Year! BENITA DODD The Legislature’s back in session; the presidential candidates’ ranks are thinning and you’re probably wondering whether there’s anything worthwhile amid the rhetoric. Governor Nathan Deal has made it quite clear that Medicaid expansion is not on his agenda, and it’s a wise move. First, why would you spend scarce state dollars on able-bodied individuals? Second, why would you force low-income Georgians into a program that is dogged by poor outcomes and low physician participation? Third, as I wrote recently in a commentary, there are opportunities in Georgia to expand health care options without expanding Medicaid. For example, the 2010 health law, which requires that most… View Article

Friday Facts: January 22, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, according to one advertisement (May 1991), a business-class 386/33 personal computer with 4MB of RAM, a 200MB hard disk and 14-inch display sold for $4,299 ($7,544 in today’s dollars). A similarly-equipped 486-33 was $7,699, or $13,511 today. Source: ZDNET.com  Events  January 27: MONDAY is the deadline to register for the Foundation’s annual National School Choice Week celebration. Join Georgia State Sen. Hunter Hill, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis for “Georgia Education: Reforms and Recommendations,” a Leadership Breakfast 8 a.m. Wednesday, January 27 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public.… View Article

Friday Facts January 15, 2016

It’s Friday! Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, Gov. Zell Miller led the Legislature to approve a lottery for Georgia, with proceeds funding special programs, including his HOPE Scholarship for college and technical-school students, pre-K programs and educational technology. This week, the nation saw the highest PowerBall jackpot ever: $1.6 billion.  Events January 27: Georgia State Sen. Hunter Hill, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis are panelists at the Foundation’s annual National School Choice Week celebration. Register now for, “Georgia Education: Reforms and Recommendations,” a Leadership Breakfast 8 a.m. Wednesday, January 27 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This panel discussion is open to… View Article
ZPolitics’ inaugural issue of Capitol Faces contained an article by Benita Dodd, vice president of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.  The article is published below; the zpolitics link is here.   WANT TO BUILD GEORGIA’S ECONOMY? PUSH BACK ON AN OVERREACHING EPA By Benita Dodd Like the federal Environmental Protection Agency’s occasional field hearings, Georgia legislators and policy-makers are inundated by environmental activists with emotional but outlandish claims about the devastation that will occur unless Regulation X or Bill Y are implemented or Activity Z is prohibited. Back in May 2011, it was the “mercury rule,” a regulation that would affect power plants responsible for nearly half of the power generation in the nation. The Georgia Public Policy Foundation testified… View Article

Friday Facts: January 8, 2016

It’s Friday! Happy New Year! The Foundation celebrates 25 years in Georgia in 2016. All year, we’ll mark this milestone anniversary with a “Then and Now” Friday Facts category! Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, the nation’s eighth-largest airline had shut down after failing to recover from a crippling 1989 union strike. About 10,000 Atlantans lost their jobs; more than two-thirds were employees at Eastern’s Atlanta flight hub. Events January 27: Georgia State Sen. Hunter Hill, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and Great Teachers’ Academy executive director Mike Davis are panelists at the Foundation’s annual National School Choice Week celebration. Register now for, “Georgia Education: Reforms View Article
The New York Times quoted Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd in a January 1, 2016, article by Alan Blinder about the Atlanta Streetcar System. The full article is below; the link to the newspaper is here. Atlanta Begins Charging for a Streetcar Named Undesirable by Some By Alan Blinder ATLANTA — The streetcar was stopped in downtown traffic, and before long Keisha Schwarzel figured that was enough of a first experience with the year-old addition to Atlanta’s transit system. “I’d rather walk,” Ms. Schwarzel, 35, said on a rain-drenched Wednesday morning. And that was when the ride was free. On Friday, looking beyond the setbacks that became grist for the mass-transit skeptics who populate the suburbs, Atlanta’s 2.7-mile,… View Article
North Carolina House Majority Leader Mike Hager discussed his state’s woes caused by a renewable portfolio mandate. December 10, 2015 I’m back in the office after a great Heartland Institute Emerging Issues South Forum in Nashville yesterday, where I moderated a panel on energy and environment issues. (I’m honored to be a Policy Advisor for the Heartland Institute.) Some takeaway points: While we’re watching the big stuff — Keystone, Clean Power Plan, fracking overregulation, etc., Bette Grande of Heartland explained, federal agencies work overtime to trip you up throughout the process, so that while you think you’ve cleared one hurdle in applications, you encounter another. Tom Tanton of the Energy and Environment Institute pointed out two things: American technological innovation… View Article

Solving the Failure of Education Desegregation

By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Education desegregation started out with such lofty promise in America. So why have decades of massive government efforts to mandate integration in schools and encourage racial diversity produced such dismal results? In his latest study, Dr. Ben Scafidi, Senior Fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, set out to examine why schools continue to be segregated and how to overcome this. He found that neighborhoods and schools both moved toward racial integration in the 1960s and ‘70s, but in the 1980s segregation began returning to public schools even as neighborhood integration continued. Public school integration reversed at the same time neighborhood segregation by income increased, according to… View Article

I wanted to publicly say how much I appreciate Georgia Public Policy Foundation.  For those of you that will be entering the Legislature or are relatively new you may not quite yet appreciate how much we rely on Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s research and work.  As you know we’re a citizen’s legislature.  We have very little staff. They have been an invaluable, invaluable resource to us.  To put this [Forum] on and the regular programs that they do throughout the year make us better at what we do. (At the 2012 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum.)

Speaker Pro Tem Jan Jones more quotes