Tag: Baruch Feigenbaum

The Georgia Senate State and Local Government Operations Committee, chaired by Sen. John Albers, held a hearing February 9 on legislation for a local countywide sales tax increase to fund transit, including 11.9-mile MARTA rail line expansion along Georgia 400. Albers invited Baruch Feigenbaum to testify. Below is Feigenbaum’s testimony.   Members of the Georgia Senate State and Local Government Operations Committee, my name is Baruch Feigenbaum. I am the Assistant Director of Transportation Policy at Reason Foundation, a non-profit think tank. I am also a Senior Fellow with the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. For almost four decades Reason’s transportation experts have been advising federal, state and local policymakers on transportation matters. My Credentials on Today’s Topic I am a… View Article
A PDF version of this Issue Analysis is available here. By Baruch Feigenbaum (This Issue Analysis is published by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation in response to a legislative request for an update of the Foundation’s August 2013 transportation study published jointly with the Reason Foundation.) Several Georgia legislators and members of the business community are supporting a sales tax increase to fund an 11.9-mile MARTA rail expansion from North Springs Station in Sandy Springs to Windward Parkway in Alpharetta. Given the high cost of expansion of rail and the corridor’s low population and employment densities, a bus rapid transit/express bus line using SR 400’s soon-to-be-constructed express lanes would be a much better option.   The Georgia General Assembly passed… View Article

Transportation Funding Matters: February 18

EVENT INVITATION January 27, 2015 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Foundation Tackles Transportation Funding at Feb. 18 Event Atlanta – The hot-button discussion has gone on for months: How will Georgia relieve traffic congestion and improve mobility, and what does the state need to do it? Is it more roads, more transit, more taxes or more options? Find out at, “Transportation Money Matters,” the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Wednesday, February 18, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The participants in this panel discussion are Georgia Public Policy Foundation President Kelly McCutchen and Baruch Feigenbaum, transportation analyst with the Reason Foundation. This Leadership Breakfast, which is open to the public, is $30 to… View Article

Making a Brave Move on the Transportation Front

By Baruch Feigenbaum  BARUCH FEIGENBAUMTransportation AnalystReason Foundation The announcement that the Atlanta Braves are abandoning Turner Field in downtown Atlanta for a location in the suburbs was a shock to almost everybody. There are many questions that must be answered, most important among them being how much of the $302 million in “public” funding will come from Cobb County taxpayers.   Assuming the Braves do move to Cobb, the county and the Braves will have to tackle the traffic nightmare that is I-285 and I-75. The Braves were unhappy with Turner Field, in part, because of insufficient nearby parking and poor freeway access. Congested traffic was the No. 1 reason fans did not attend games. And while leaving the heart of… View Article

Practical Strategies Can Increase Mobility in Georgia

By Baruch Feigenbaum  BARUCH FEIGENBAUMTransportation AnalystReason Foundation Even the through travelers know it: Georgia’s transportation system is inadequate. Metro Atlanta has the seventh-worst congestion in the country, the freeway network lacks capacity for expected growth from the Port of Savannah deepening, and rural areas lack transportation options.    There is an opportunity to develop a quality transportation network – without raising taxes – if policy-makers embrace a new proposal by the Reason Foundation. Unlike existing plans, which make spot improvements, The Reason plan, unveiled in August at a Georgia Public Policy Foundation Policy Briefing Luncheon, is a $35 billion proposal that develops a freeway network, arterial network, and transit network across the entire state.   For metro Atlanta freeways, the plan modifies… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT August 1, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Register Now for ‘Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier’ Atlanta – Have you registered yet? Join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 at the Georgian Club for a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon keynoted by Foundation Senior Fellow Baruch Feigenbaum, “Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier.” Feigenbaum, a metro Atlanta resident and Transportation Policy Analyst at the Reason Foundation, will unveil his new study, “Reducing Traffic Congestion and Increasing Mobility in Atlanta: 2013.” He is author of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation 2012 Issue Analysis, “Getting Georgia Going: An Analysis of the Referendum on Georgia’s Transportation Special Local Options Sales… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION EVENT July 17, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org August 28 Event Focuses on ‘Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier’ Atlanta – You are invited to join the Georgia Public Policy Foundation on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 at the Georgian Club for a noon Policy Briefing Luncheon keynoted by Foundation Senior Fellow Baruch Feigenbaum, “Georgia Transportation: The Next Frontier.” Feigenbaum, a metro Atlanta resident and Transportation Policy Analyst at the Reason Foundation, will unveil his new study, “Reducing Traffic Congestion and Increasing Mobility in Atlanta: 2013.” Baruch FeigenbaumSenior FellowGeorgia Public Policy Foundation This event is open to the public and will cost $30 to attend. Register online by Monday, August 26, at http://tinyurl.com/ln9lmhv View Article
By Baruch Feigenbaum Baruch FeigenbaumSenior FellowGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Discussions are resuming in the Southeast about a high-speed rail corridor. Unfortunately, the  evidence suggests that high-speed rail’s limited success in Europe and Asia is not transferrable to the United States. From a financial standpoint, things don’t look good. The majority of high-speed rail lines require large government subsidies from both general taxpayers and drivers. Even with generous subsidies, traveling by high-speed rail is still more expensive than flying for 12 of the 23 most popular high-speed rail routes in the world. The evidence suggests that high-speed rail can only be competitive on routes that are 200-to 500 miles in length. High-speed rail is also very expensive to build. Most new… View Article
By Baruch Feigenbaum On July 31, 2012, voters in 12 regions in Georgia, including a 10-county Atlanta region, will decide in a referendum whether to enact a 1 percent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (T-SPLOST) for transportation. To help Georgians understand the ramifications of the referendum, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has released an Issue Analysis: “Getting Georgia Going: An Analysis of the Referendum On Georgia’s Transportation Special Purpose Local Options Sales Tax.” With Georgia ranked 49th in transportation spending, the question should focus not on whether the state needs to increase investment in its transportation network, but what is the best, most efficient and politically realistic way to do so. Given this framework, there are reasons for voting… View Article
By Baruch Feigenbaum On July 31, 2012, voters in 12 regions in Georgia, including a 10-county Atlanta region, will decide in a referendum whether to enact a 1 percent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (T-SPLOST) for transportation. To help Georgians understand the ramifications of the referendum, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has released an Issue Analysis: “Getting Georgia Going: An Analysis of the Referendum On Georgia’s Transportation Special Purpose Local Options Sales Tax.” With Georgia ranked 49th in transportation spending, the question should focus not on whether the state needs to increase investment in its transportation network, but what is the best, most efficient and politically realistic way to do so. Given this framework, there are reasons for voting… View Article

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Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers more quotes