Category: News

HERMAN CAIN Herman Cain’s father worked as a janitor, barber and chauffeur.  His son would become a candidate for the United States Senate and later President of the United States after a stunningly successful business career.  Today he is best known as a nationally syndicated conservative radio talk show host, author, frequent contributor on several broadcast networks and constant activist for conservative policy issues. Cain spoke about “Leadership is Common Sense” after he received the Conservative Policy Leadership Institute’s Principles Award for his lifetime devotion to conservative philosophies at the fifth annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum. Cain is a 1967 Morehouse College graduate. He earned a masters’ degree in computer science from Purdue University while working for the U.S. Department… View Article
CLINT BOLICK A New York Times article praised Clint Bolick for his “aggressive litigation to defend individual liberties.”  Legal Times magazine recognized him as one of the 90 greatest Washington, D.C. lawyers of the previous 30 years. His resume includes co-founder of the Institute for Justice and president of the Alliance for School Choice before he joined the Goldwater Institute seven years ago.  At Goldwater he presides over litigation and one of his favorite phrases is, “I get paid to sue government bureaucrats.” The fifth annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum audience warmly welcomed Bolick when he delivered the Education Keynote Address on Friday, September 19 in Atlanta. Bolick focused on school choice with a particular emphasis on education savings accounts… View Article

Reason Foundation dispels express toll lane myths

From Bob Poole of the Reason Foundation in his Surface Transportation Innovations Newsletter: Distortions of Fact on North Carolina Toll Concession Project The I-77 express toll lanes project in Charlotte is proceeding despite an active grass-roots campaign against it. This effort is making many of the same kinds of misleading or outright false allegations about the project that have surfaced in Georgia, Texas, and elsewhere, so it’s important that transportation professionals understand what they are up against from this type of opposition. The most respectable summary of these allegations was put out in June by a think tank called Civitas NC, drawing on the work of grass-roots activists. Written by Rachael Dobi, its headline was “I-77 HOT Lanes: a Bargain… View Article

Astonishing Early Results from GA Juvenile Justice Reform

MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein Buoyed by freshly funded incarceration alternatives, Georgia reduced new juvenile justice detention commitments by an astonishing 62 percent during the nine month period that ended in June. As a result, the average daily secure population rate is also trending down as is the length of time juveniles are waiting for a detention center placement. “While it’s still early, we feel great about where we are,” Department of Juvenile Justice assistant deputy commissioner Joe Vignati told the Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform on Tuesday morning. This was the Council’s first meeting since May although several committees met during the summer. DJJ Deputy Commissioner Carl Brown led off with an historical overview… View Article

Utopian Academy Determined to Succeed in Clayton County

Sixth in a series about new Georgia start-up charter public schools MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein We hear a lot about how reduced state funding caused public school systems to schedule fewer than the 180-day traditional calendar. This year sixth and seventh graders at Utopian Academy for the Arts were scheduled for 190 school days, even as students in the Clayton County public school system are scheduled for 175 days. That would be three more school weeks at Utopian. “Our school year looks a lot different from the traditional public school setting,” said Utopian founder and executive director Artesius Miller. There are other differences. Classrooms are single gender and Utopian offers middle school electives that you… View Article
Fifth in a series about new Georgia start-up public charter schools MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein Each morning students at Atlanta Classical Academy finish the Pledge of Allegiance and then they add, “I will learn the true. I will do the good. I will love the beautiful.” ACA Principal Terrence Moore said he introduced these simple ideas because, “If they can hold by those principles and if they really commit them in their minds and hearts then they will have a life that is rich and full of happiness.” Atlanta Classic Academy opened this month at full capacity with 488 K-through-8 students in a former private school located on Northside Drive in northwest Atlanta. ACA is… View Article
Fourth in a series about new Georgia start-up public charter schools MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein Playing in the dirt will have an educational twist when Chattahoochee Hills Charter School opens next Monday in south Fulton County. With its emphasis on the environment, learning will take place inside and outside and classrooms will have removable walls that open to the great outdoors for hybrid inside – outside learning. “We are part of the natural world,” said Chattahoochee founding Principal Chad Webb. “It takes all of us to create an environment that is safe and healthy and sustainable. I need individuals who want to get down and dirty with the scholars. Whatever we can do to create… View Article
Third in a series about new Georgia start-up public charter schools MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein When the Academy for Classical Education opened this month elementary and middle school students had already finished extensive summer reading assignments even though they had never been inside a classroom, never met a teacher, never been to the cafeteria and never met new friends at Macon’s newest public charter school. The reading emphasis was, classical! “Because we’ve stripped a lot of true literature out of typical public education students are no longer able to tap into the emotion that engages them when they are reading,” said ACE co-founder and Principal Laura Perkins. This summer ACE students read classical works by… View Article
Second in a series about new Georgia start-up public charter schools. MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein No Georgia economic development initiative has been more stunningly successful over the past decade than the 2,200-acre KIA Motors Manufacturing plant at West Point in Troup County. The region added more than 11,700 jobs directly because of KIA. That created a special challenge. “When KIA came into the LaGrange – Troup County area one of the things that the community realized is that they really didn’t have the workforce,” said Kathy Carlisle.“They began a lot of discussions about how do we have the workforce to support KIA and their suppliers as well as other industries.” KIA opened in 2010 and… View Article

Tapestry Public Charter School’s Special Mission

First in a series about new Georgia start-up public charter schools. MIKE KLEINEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Mike Klein Devon Orland Christopher has a high profile position as the state’s senior assistant attorney general for civil rights litigation but her job as Mom is way more important. “My son is what they call twice exceptional. He’s gifted. That is what gave birth to the school,” said Christopher who is co-founder of the Tapestry Public Charter School that opened today in DeKalb County. Co-founder Tonna Harris-Bosselmann also has an autistic spectrum child. Autism is one among several behavioral disorders that can affect how children interact and engage socially. Their chances to succeed often are enhanced in smaller group settings and… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is our state’s leading organization promoting government transparency. The Secretary of State’s office shares the Foundation’s commitment to transparency and responsible stewardship of taxpayer dollars, which is why our agency was the first in Georgia to publish its budget and spending data on a public transparency website.

Karen Handel, Georgia Secretary of State more quotes