Category: News

Published May 3, 2013 By Mike Klein Mike KleinEditor, Georgia Public Policy Foundation One of the primary architects of the special council recommendations that became the basis for this year’s juvenile justice reform legislation says the primary reason that thousands of juveniles enter the legal system each year is because they come from dysfunctional families. “Most of the kids we’re seeing today in most courts are kids in which we have broken families, most of them have single parents, most of those are mothers and there are poor or very weak problem solving skills, not just among the young people but also their parents,” Clayton County Juvenile Court Chief Judge Steven Teske told the Georgia Public Policy Foundation this week.… View Article
Published May 1, 2013 By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Georgia’s next justice reform priorities will start with expanded digital learning in juvenile sectors and increased focus on transitioning paroled adult inmates back into society with more than a few bucks and a bus ticket.  Governor Nathan Deal discussed these priorities during an Atlanta speech on Tuesday, two days before he is scheduled to sign juvenile justice reform legislation. Deal said the state will partner with Provost Academy Georgia to provide digital learning resources to juveniles, starting with some 140 who participate in the Georgia National Guard Youth Challenge programs at Fort Gordon near Augusta and Fort Stewart in Hinesville. “These are young men and women who… View Article
GEORGIA PUBLIC POLICY FOUNDATION MEDIA RELEASE April 30, 2013 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Sajan George Highlights, ‘The Future of Education,’ at May 23 Leadership Breakfast Atlanta – The world is changing fast, but we seem to be standing still when it comes to educating our children. How do we take advantage of the opportunities to personalize learning for every student? How do we enhance academic performance? Is the solution more money, more teachers or smaller class sizes? What role does technology play? Find out what’s wrong, what’s right and what to do with the three Rs from education entrepreneur Sajan George, founder and CEO of Matchbook Learning, at, “The Future of Education,” a Georgia… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Governor Nathan Deal on Thursday signed an adult criminal justice reform bill that revises minimum mandatory sentencing laws, expands the state’s right to evidence appeals and creates a new Georgia Criminal Justice Reform Commission that will remain on-the-watch until 2023.  In sum, the state will continue to consider criminal justice best practices for another ten years. The House Bill 349 signing ceremony was held in Marietta where Deal said, “When I first became Governor I was concerned about something that I was told Republicans shouldn’t really be concerned about and that was the fact that we were the tenth largest state in population but that we had the fourth largest prison… View Article

Student Outreach Scholarship Program Announcement

This week the Georgia Public Policy Foundation formally announced its new Student Outreach Scholarship Program that will enable university students to network with leading conservative policy makers at no charge to the students or to their schools.  Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd unveiled the scholarship program at our April 23 telemedicine leadership event. Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation “It’s called the S.O.S. program because we need to start Saving Our Students,” Dodd said.  “We have liberal academia out there who are seizing the moment and we are lagging so what we decided to do is sponsor at least a table of students at every event.” Half a dozen Georgia Institute of Technology students were on-hand Tuesday morning… View Article
By Eric Wearne Eric WearneSenior FellowGeorgia Public Policy Foundation The United States government – our federal government – has taken what some might consider an alarming position in the question of whether families that prefer homeschooling can seek asylum here when teaching children at home is considered a crime in their own countries, punishable with prison terms and even having children removed from parental custody. The U.S. position is pretty straight and forward, as it is being argued in a Tennessee case that involves parents from Germany who came here in 2008.  The U.S. Department of Justice in federal court documents has argued that home schooling is not grounds for seeking asylum.   The case has not finally been decided but… View Article

Georgia Can Lead Again on Juvenile Justice Reform

By Newt Gingrich and Kelly McCutchen Newt Gingrich Kelly McCutchen Years of profound dysfunction in Washington have eroded Americans’ confidence in government. Our national leaders have lost virtually all their credibility when it comes to addressing society’s most pressing challenges. Fortunately, just as our Founders intended, states are increasingly finding innovative policy solutions for many of these problems. Can you imagine Congress ever accomplishing such a feat? Now Georgia has the opportunity to apply those same conservative convictions to its juvenile justice system by adopting the recommendations of the Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform.  After months of research last year, the bipartisan Council produced proposals that will stop wasteful government spending and help more of Georgia’s young offenders fulfill… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Georgians appear ready to embrace juvenile justice reforms that would focus the state’s lock-ups on higher-level offenders and put new emphasis on less expensive and more effective community resources for lower-level offenders.  And by Georgians, we mean folks out there in the real world, well beyond the State Capitol in Atlanta. A newly released poll conducted by Public Opinion Strategies and the Mellman Group for the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Public Safety Performance Project found proposed reforms in HB 242 enjoy widespread support among conservatives, liberals and independents.  The bill would enact recommendations from the 2012 Special Council on Criminal Justice Reform. HB 242 is scheduled for its first Senate hearing on… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation The Georgia House voted 173 – 0 Thursday morning to pass juvenile justice and civil code reforms that would dramatically change our response to young people who commit crimes, run away,  violate probation or who are in desperate need of services.  HB 242, the biggest rethink in Georgia juvenile strategies in decades, is a massive 244-page bill that would rewrite juvenile justice and civil code.  Now the bill moves to the Senate.  (Watch the House floor discussion and vote.) Friday the House is scheduled to vote on HB 349, companion legislation for the adult system that would change the minimum mandatory sentencing laws for drug trafficking and other serious felony… View Article
By Mike Klein Mike Klein, EditorGeorgia Public Policy Foundation Thousands of daycare workers now employed statewide would be required to undergo federal fingerprint background checks under legislation introduced in the House.  Not all at once, mind you, as there would be a phase-in period but eventually, there would be a more complete picture about the felony criminal histories of day care workers, including possible abuse histories. “The safety and security of children are the primary concerns,” said Carolyn Salvador, executive director at the Georgia Child Care Association (GCCA) which is the state’s largest organization representing day care centers.  GCCA has endorsed passage of HB 350.  And, it has been at the table alongside state officials to address issues that… View Article

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