Category: Facts

Atlanta Police Force on Track to Get Body Cameras

Amid the nationally ongoing and sometimes emotionally charged discussion of police interactions and transparency, Atlanta is moving toward body cameras for law enforcement officers. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Atlanta City Council voted to spend nearly $6 million to purchase 1,200 of the cameras, which are designed to capture officers’ actions without the ability for interruption or editing footage. This amount of cameras will cover over half of all active officers, as APD consists of approximately 2000 sworn police officers as of 2014, according to an annual Atlanta Police Department Report. In areas where body cameras have already been deployed, the response has been positive from both the officers and the communities they police. “I don’t know… View Article

Does More Money Improve Outcomes?

Fifty years ago, James S. Coleman published a groundbreaking education report that many call the fountainhead for those committed to evidence-based education policy. Among other things, Coleman found that variations in per-pupil expenditure had little correlation with student outcomes. Even to this day, there remains the simple question as to whether, other things equal, just adding more money to schools will systematically lead to higher achievement. Figure 2 shows the overall record of states during the past quarter century. Changes in real state spending per pupil are uncorrelated with changes in 4th-grade student achievement in reading. Similar results are obtained in math and in both math and reading at the 8th-grade level. Clearly, states have changed in many other ways… View Article

Do Governments Underplay Buses, Favor Rail?

In an editorial below from Transportation Reviews  that was published online in March 2016, author David A. Hensher opines on, “Why is Light Rail Starting to Dominate Bus Rapid Transit Yet Again?” Read the full text here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01441647.2016.1155851. Below are some excerpts that are relevant to Georgia governments in making sensible choices among transit modes. This highlight sums up his viewpoint:  “The value for money proposition should deliver the best outcome for society regardless of whether it is rail or bus based, in their light and heavy configuration.” Almost weekly, we see proposals to build light rail in many cities, and Australian cities are no exception. It is also quite marked how absent any serious consideration of… View Article
The most climate-friendly reliable source of power is nuclear energy, yet environmental activists largely campaign against nuclear. Michael Shellenberger shares the fascinating history and motives of activists’ opposition in, “CLEAN ENERGY IS ON THE DECLINE — HERE’S WHY, AND WHAT WE CAN DO ABOUT IT,” in Public Utilities Fortnightly. Shellenberger writes: Utilities that own nuclear power plants are in serious financial trouble. While it is tempting to blame low natural gas prices and misplaced post-Fukushima jitters, nuclear’s troubles are rooted in regulatory capture — a capture that finds its genesis in the origins of the U.S. environmental movement. This capture is now threatening to bring this climate-friendly energy source to the brink. … How then did environmentalists come to view… View Article

Financial Technology Continues to Grow in Georgia

This article appeared in Insider Advantage on April 8, 2016 and is reprinted with permission. Financial Technology Continues to Grow in Georgia By Bill Armistead  While most Georgians are familiar with industry leaders like Coca Cola, UPS, Delta, Home Depot, Aflac and Southern Company, the rapid-growth sector to watch is financial technology — with names like First Data, NCR, Elavon, TSYS, SunTrust, and WorldPay. Every year, Georgia’s growing Financial Technology (FinTech) industry is moving closer to surpassing New York and California as the nation’s most active tech centers for electronic transactions. The Technology Association of Georgia cites the independent Nilson Report showing that there were over 135 billion payment card transactions in 2011, representing about $2.3 trillion in total consumer… View Article

Direct Care Resources

As the General Assembly debates the merits of direct care arrangements, here are some resources for those who want more information on this subject: Direct Primary Care (DPC) Puts Patients Back in the Driver’s Seat Empowering the relationship between doctors and patients is the key to achieving superior health outcomes, lower costs and an enhanced patient experience. DPC fosters this relationship by focusing on five key tenets: Service: The hallmark of DPC is adequate time spent between patient and physician, creating an enduring doctor-patient relationship. Patient Choice: Patients in DPC choose their own personal physician and are reactive partners in their healthcare. Elimination of Fee-For-Service: DPC eliminates undesired fee-for-service(FFS) incentives in primary care. These incentives distort healthcare decision-making by… View Article

School Choice Benefits: More than test scores

Hundreds of school children braved chilly temperatures to attend the National School Choice Week rally at the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta In a new article for Education Next, Martin R. West of Harvard University explains that research focused solely on standardized test scores will understate the benefits of school choice programs, since effects on high school graduation and college enrollment are stronger—especially among urban minority students. The study builds on early research on school choice by James S. Coleman: The chief beneficiaries of policies that expand parental choice appear to be urban minority students—precisely the group that Coleman argued has the least choice in a public school system in which school assignment depends on where a family lives. And… View Article
The Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform has released its 2016 Report, which provides a summary of progress to date and a list of recommendations. Below are excerpts from the report’s executive summary. It is often said that the states are our laboratories of democracy. With criminal justice reform, this is undeniably true. Over the past decade, more than two dozen states have enacted significant reforms to their sentencing and correctional systems, changes that have improved public safety while holding offenders accountable and reducing taxpayer costs. Unlike so many policy issues in America today, criminal justice reform has been embraced with overwhelming bipartisan support. As 2016 begins, Congress and President Obama are acknowledging the substantial progress unfolding in the… View Article

The 2016 State of the State Address

Gov. Nathan Deal delivered the annual State of the State address and introduced his 2017 budget recommendations last week. Here are some of the recommendations and comments: More support for high-demand skills training: “…over the past three years, we have identified 11 areas where a student will receive a 100 percent tuition HOPE Grant to obtain that training. These Strategic Industries Workforce Development Grants cover 140 programs, and I am recommending that we add industrial maintenance this year to that important list.” Additional funding for Dual Enrollment: “Our Move On When Ready legislation from last year, coupled with additional funding for Dual Enrollment, has greatly accelerated the pace of many students’ educational journeys. This allows high school students… View Article
The cost of higher education is skyrocketing across the nation, including in Georgia. But how does Georgia compare to other states? The average amount of annual in-state tuition and fees at Georgia’s public universities increased by more than 31 percent over the last five years (a greater increase than all but one state). The average amount of tuition and fees, $8,447, ranks below the national average at 31st. Net tuition revenue per FTE (tuition after scholarships and other grants) is $4,468, ranking Georgia 41st highest in the nation. State funding per student is $7,297, which ranks 14th highest in the nation. Amount Rank Average Annual In-State Tuition & Fees at Public Four-Year Institutions, 2015-16 $8,447 31 Percentage Change in In-State… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation bases its findings on fact, and maintains the standard of truth.

U.S. Attorney General Griffin Bell more quotes