Category: Commentaries

Expand Health Care, Not Government

By Nina Owcharenko It’s official: Indiana has given in and adopted ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion. Before jumping into the weeds of Indiana’s Medicaid expansion agreement with the Obama administration, it is important to realize the agreement still fails some basic principles of reform. First, it adds more people on to the Medicaid rolls, not fewer. The Indiana plan puts 350,000 more Hoosiers on to the overstretched welfare program. Reform should be grounded in reducing Medicaid dependence, not increasing it. Second, it requires more government spending, not less. The Indiana plan will increase Medicaid spending by having the federal taxpayers pick up 90 percent of the costs. Again, reforms should aim to reduce government spending, not increase or merely shift it. Third,… View Article

Georgia School Choice Creeps Forward

By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD When National School Choice Week was launched in 2010, there were just 150 events around the nation, one of them the Georgia Policy Public Policy Foundation’s. This year, the Foundation’s Leadership Breakfast on January 21 was one of 11,500 events marking this annual event. Officially, National School Choice Week takes place January 21-31. The Foundation’s 2014 event barely beat the January 28 ice storm that paralyzed Atlanta and cancelled the annual rally at the State Capitol. There’s no rally this year, either, but not for want of support. “We’ve had great attendance and enthusiasm from thousands of students, parents and legislators across the state in the past few years,” said Randy Hicks, whose Georgia View Article

Transit Should Stay off Tracks and on the Road

By Baruch Feigenbaum BARUCH FEIGENBAUMTransportation AnalystReason Foundation This legislative session, the Georgia General Assembly is expected to tackle transportation reform, with many hoping lawmakers address both roadways and transit. It appears they will: At a recent transportation industry gathering, state leaders including Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle detailed the importance of transit. Unfortunately, Metro Atlanta has one of the most deficient transit systems of any major metro area in the country. A recent Brookings Institution study ranked Atlanta 10th worst in the country for combined access to transit and employment. Transit serves only 38 percent of metro Atlanta residents. Only 22 percent of jobs are accessible by transit. Only 3.4 percent of jobs are a 45-minute, one-way commute via transit. Only… View Article
By Jim Kelly and Ben Scafidi Georgia has one of the more popular K-12 tuition tax credit programs in America, which is funded by the private contributions of approximately 18,000 individual taxpayers and 200 corporate taxpayers, who receive a state income tax credit for their contributions. These contributions are made to qualified student scholarship organizations (“SSOs”) that provide scholarships to eligible students, most of whom are from low- or middle-income families. Surveys indicate they are overwhelmingly satisfied with their private school choices. In the case of the Georgia GOAL Scholarship Program, the state’s largest SSO, 93 percent of scholarship funds have been given to students who transferred from a public school to a private school, or who entered school for… View Article
By Jim Kelly  Jim Kelly In a recent speech at the National Press Club, U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer, (D-NY) explained that improving economic opportunities for middle-class Americans is the key issue on which Democrats and Republicans should be focusing leading up to 2016 Presidential election and beyond.  If this is the case, the Georgia Legislature can advance an important piece of the middle class agenda: Increase the annual cap on income tax credits available for contributions to scholarship programs that fund private school options for K-12 students from low- and middle-income families.  Schumer’s speech was a watershed moment. He acknowledged that the Democrat Party has failed to address the ways in which technology and globalization have buffeted the economic fortunes… View Article
Dear Friend, (Don’t you hate those letters that make you wait until the very end to find out what people really want from you? I do! So … As you read this, please know that tomorrow is Giving Tuesday and a good opportunity to support your Georgia Public Policy Foundation.) Think tanks, the early days: I met Jo Kwong of the Atlas Foundation (left) and Joe Lehman of the Mackinac Center at my first State Policy Network conference in 2003. I dug up a photograph over the weekend I’ll call, “think tanks, the early days.” It was taken in 2003 at my first annual State Policy Network conference of state think tanks. In it, I’m flanked by two champions… View Article

U.S. Senate Votes to Oppose Freedom

By Bartlett D. Cleland  Bartlett Cleland Our civil liberties suffered another loss this week when the Senate chose to duck surveillance reform by killing the USA Freedom Act. The legislation would have limited the data dragnet that is currently being used to harvest Americans’ personal information via spying laws. Specifically, the legislation would have ended “bulk collection under Section 215 of the Patriot Act” and required the federal “government to more aggressively filter and discard information about Americans accidentally collected through PRISM and related programs.” In addition, all Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA) decisions for the last decade that included a significant interpretation of the law would have had to be disclosed publicly, and “Internet and telecom companies would be… View Article

Outlaw Policing for Profit in Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Back in 1966, Bobby Fuller sang about, “Robbin’ people with a six-gun, I fought the law and the law won.” And rightfully so: Robbery is a crime. But what happens when it’s the law doing the robbing and the law wins? Civil asset forfeiture is supposed to be a process in which law enforcement agencies seize property and cash they have reason to believe were involved in a crime. A spate of stories from around the nation, however, reveals that too often, it’s a matter of “policing for profit:” seizing property and money of innocent people because agencies benefit directly from the proceeds. For years, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Institute… View Article

Time for Truth In Medicare Accounting

By Kelly McCutchen and Patrick Gleason The mid-term elections are in the rearview mirror, but Congress still has a lot of important work to take care of before lawmakers go home at year’s end and the newly elected are sworn in next January. At the top of the “Lame duck” to-do list: Congress must address urgent problems with Medicare – the most costly federal program and largest driver of national debt – or there will be harsh ramifications for seniors and caregivers in Georgia. The first step is to address accounting gimmicks that hide the true cost of Medicare and how much it will grow the debt in coming years and decades. The program currently operates under a phony spending… View Article

What Economics Can Teach Us about Ebola

By John C. Goodman John C. Goodman There are two fundamentally different ways of thinking about complex social systems: the economic approach and the engineering approach. The thinking about Ebola at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reflects the engineering approach. The behavior of everyone else reflects the economic approach. Social engineers see society as disorganized, unplanned and inefficient. The solution? Let experts take over. Social engineers inevitably believe that a plan can work even though everyone who is expected to carry it out has a self-interest in defeating it. Implicitly they assume that incentives don’t matter. Or if they do matter, they don’t matter very much. Economics is the science of incentives. Almost everything interesting that economists… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has hit another homerun with its Guide to the Issues. This is must reading for anyone interested in public policy in Georgia, and it is an outstanding road map for conservative, common sense solutions to our challengers of today and tomorrow.

Former Georgia Senate Minority Leader Chuck Clay more quotes