Category: Commentaries

By Harold Brown Harold Brown, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation Charity is from the noblest of impulses. But it must come from the heart; governments can’t do it. Most democratic governments have representatives who feel it, but charity can’t be built on taxes. Charity is not giving away someone else’s goods. The two main problems with the government urge to care for the needs of its citizens are making it fair and knowing when to quit. It is bad enough to pay taxes to the federal government to fix roads, airports, foreign dictators and commerce. The ever-increasing use of tax dollars to give as cash or benefits to individuals is enough to push us over the psychological (and fiscal)… View Article
This commentary is excerpted from testimony before the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services. By Todd Zywicki An animating premise of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank) was the belief that a primary source of financial instability was an inadequate consumer financial protection regime at the federal level.  Dodd-Frank sought to address those perceived deficiencies by creating the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (CFPB) and vesting that new super-bureaucracy wielding an unprecedented combination of vast, vaguely defined substantive powers with no democratic accountability.  At the outset, allow me to stress that I personally agreed with the proposal to combine the administration of federal consumer financial protection laws under one agency’s roof. The preexisting system was too… View Article

The Dignity of Work

By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHENPresident, Georgia Public Policy Foundation For most people, chronic homelessness among men would not be the first choice among problems to tackle in inner-city Atlanta. Millions of dollars in government and charitable programs give some of these men a warm bed at night, but that hasn’t changed the underlying challenges that keep them on the streets. Yet that’s exactly where Bill McGahan started. McGahan had an audacious idea: Create a program where “upon graduation the goal is a permanent job and permanent housing for each man.” “When men enter the program they are typically dependent on drugs and handouts. When they leave, the goal is to never be dependent again.” In 2013, he created Georgia Works,… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Susette Kelo was minding her own business when the city of New London, Conn., set its sights on her home. The city wanted to take the property and demolish the home, along with her neighbors’ homes, to make way for private economic development. Kelo decided to fight back. The Institute for Justice led her fight, joined by think tanks around the country, including the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. Remember the shocked property owners around the nation when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on June 10, 2005, that the city could take Kelo’s home and land against her will? The Court said it was the states’ responsibility to toughen the laws on eminent domain that… View Article
By Nina Owcharenko This week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the administration to allow ObamaCare subsidies to flow through This is a disappointment for the rule of law and for the states that have fought to keep some of ObamaCare’s flawed policies out of their states. While the administration and ObamaCare supporters attempt to convince the American people that it is now smooth sailing for ObamaCare, nothing could be further from the truth. Despite the decision, the problems with ObamaCare are real and not getting better. The law’s flawed foundation continues to make ObamaCare unworkable, unaffordable and unpopular. As my colleague Ed Haislmaier skillfully points out, “The complexity and cascade of adverse effects are the… View Article

Health Reform 2.0

RON BACHMANSenior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation By Ronald E. Bachman Whatever you think about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more changes are on the way. What will the next wave of health reform look like and when will it happen? With the pending Supreme Court decision on the ACA subsidies, Health Reform 2.0 may happen sooner rather than later. Whether the changes are modifications, replacements, repeal or expansion, certain basic principles should be at the core of Health Reform 2.0. Objectives: 1. Personalized Healthcare – Government mandated one-size-fits-all plan designs should be eliminated in favor of more options that are affordable and meet individual and family needs. Individuals should be rewarded for healthy choices and engagement in healthy… View Article

Health Care Proposal Improves With Age

By John R. Graham You’ve got to give credit to Congressman Tom Price, MD: He introduced his first post-ObamaCare bill as early as 2009 and has reintroduced an updated version in every Congress since then. The latest Empowering Patients First Act (H.R. 2300), introduced this month, is the fourth iteration. Many critics complain Republicans in Congress have taken too long to develop an alternative to Obamacare. However, President Obama is running the show until January 2017. It is responsible for Congressional Republicans to take all the time and space they need to develop their alternative for the next president’s consideration. A fully baked repeal and replacement bill today would serve no purpose, while doing nothing until a president committed to… View Article
By Brandon Arnold and Benita M. Dodd The congressional debate over trade has been white-hot in recent weeks. With the support of both Georgia senators, Johnny Isakson and David Perdue, the U.S. Senate just approved Trade Promotion Authority, which would help the United States enter into more trade agreements with foreign nations, benefiting people right here in Georgia. As the debate shifts to the U.S. House of Representatives, a bizarre political coupling has emerged against Trade Promotion Authority (TPA): the union bosses and many of their traditional anti-trade friends on the left seem to have forged an alliance with some members of the Tea Party, which is traditionally aligned with the right. In one corner of this odd alliance the… View Article

Making Military Lives Matter

  By Benita M. Dodd BENITA DODD Memorial Day Weekend, as you’ve heard time and again, is that long weekend marking the unofficial start of the summer: beaches, boats and barbecue fun in the sun. With all the frolicking, many may overlook that Monday is, first and foremost, a special day set aside to remember those Americans who have died serving in our armed forces. Two encounters in the week before the holiday have reinforced how times have changed in the military but, in many ways, they remain the same. They highlight the positive changes brought by technology. And they’re a reminder that even though military service may be voluntary, families still make heart-wrenching sacrifices. The first was a Facebook… View Article
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution published an op-ed on May 19, 2015, about the Atlanta Streetcar by Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd, “A streetcar named denial.” Read it on the newspaper’s Web site here (subscription required); the full text is below. A streetcar named denial By Benita Dodd After almost five months of official Atlanta Streetcar operation, city officials are exploring route expansion to the Beltline. But storefronts boarded up and covered by newsprint along the route are their own news story on the economic-development promise. It may be that the promises are simply slow to be fulfilled. Nevertheless, looking ahead to Streetcar promises should require looking back on past promises. Deadlines: The streetcar was originally scheduled to begin operating in… View Article

The Foundation’s Criminal Justice Initiative pushed the problems to the forefront, proposed practical solutions, brought in leaders from other states to share examples, and created this nonpartisan opportunity. (At the signing of the 2012 Criminal Justice Reform bill.)

Governor Nathan Deal more quotes