Category: Transportation

‘Plan T:’ For Georgia Traffic and So Much More

By Michael Dziak Despite the efforts of many to persuade voters to approve a penny regional transportation sales tax, the 10-year, $8 billion proposal is off the table for metro Atlanta, at least for now. But perhaps the “Plan B” for congestion relief that many are asking for should be “Plan T” for “Technology.” Atlanta has already established itself as a technological center, yet only a small percentage of organizations have maximized the potential of this technology. State and locally driven efforts could and should be aimed at helping business leaders understand, deploy and effectively utilize technology to accelerate economic recovery in a way that will lead to rapid, sustainable growth and prosperity: Create an engaged workforce Reduce commuter trips… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Given the wall-to-wall coverage of the upcoming regional transportation sales tax referendum, Georgians could hardly be blamed for believing that all transportation improvement in the state, and especially metro Atlanta, hinges on voter approval of the 10-year, penny sales tax on July 31. In fact, there are ways to improve transportation policy and funding that can and should be implemented, whether the tax passes or not. Mass transit is a big sticking point in the list of projects that would be funded if the 10-year tax is approved in the metro Atlanta area. About 52 percent of $6.2 billion slated for regional projects would go to transit – in a region where less than 3.6 percent… View Article
By Baruch Feigenbaum   On July 31, 2012, voters in 12 regions in Georgia, including a 10-county Atlanta region, will decide in a referendum whether to enact a 1 percent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (T-SPLOST) for transportation. To help Georgians understand the ramifications of the referendum, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has released an Issue Analysis: “Getting Georgia Going: An Analysis of the Referendum On Georgia’s Transportation Special Purpose Local Options Sales Tax.”   With Georgia ranked 49th in transportation spending, the question should focus not on whether the state needs to increase investment in its transportation network, but what is the best, most efficient and politically realistic way to do so. Given this framework, there are reasons… View Article
On July 31, 2012, voters in 12 regions in Georgia, including a 10-county metro Atlanta region, will decide whether to enact a 1 percent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (T-SPLOST) for transportation. The list of transportation projects for each region is unique and each region’s voters will need to acquaint themselves with the relevant details of their list. Along with the Coastal Georgia region, which involves the Savannah-area freight- and port-related projects, probably the most crucial region for the July 31 vote is the metro Atlanta region, which not only has the greatest congestion and mobility challenges but the greatest population concentration in the state. For this reason, this paper focuses on the metro Atlanta region. With Georgia ranked… View Article
By Baruch Feigenbaum On July 31, 2012, voters in 12 regions in Georgia, including a 10-county Atlanta region, will decide in a referendum whether to enact a 1 percent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (T-SPLOST) for transportation. To help Georgians understand the ramifications of the referendum, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation has released an Issue Analysis: “Getting Georgia Going: An Analysis of the Referendum On Georgia’s Transportation Special Purpose Local Options Sales Tax.” With Georgia ranked 49th in transportation spending, the question should focus not on whether the state needs to increase investment in its transportation network, but what is the best, most efficient and politically realistic way to do so. Given this framework, there are reasons for voting… View Article
By Benita Dodd Benita Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation The “Untie Atlanta” commercials on radio and TV are nothing if not clever. Frustrated commuters can relate to the visual onslaught on TV of roads tangled in a giant knot and the radio announcement, accompanied by blaring horns, that says “Traffic in metro Atlanta is tied up in knots … Let’s untie the knot. Vote yes for the July 31 Regional Transportation Referendum.” Without a doubt, inadequate transportation spending has led to congestion and reduced mobility in this state. If voters in each of the 12 regions support the referendum, a penny transportation special local option sales tax (T-SPLOST) will fund its tailored list of projects. Some of them… View Article
By Benita Dodd The headline on an article in The Onion satirical magazine in 2000 was, “Report: 98 Percent Of U.S. Commuters Favor Public Transportation For Others.” Sometimes truth is even stranger than fiction. Fewer than four out of every 100 metro Atlanta workers rely on public transportation for their daily commutes, according to Census Bureau data. Yet the priorities in proposals for congestion relief in metro Atlanta would lead any outsider to believe that the public is clamoring for more mass transit. The preference for automobiles should be driving the project list, but it’s clearly foolish to dismiss the need for public transportation in the region. For good or bad, two upcoming initiatives could impact the future of… View Article

Transportation Briefs

 Transportation Round-Up Compiled by GPPF Vice President Benita Dodd Misguided, misinformed and missing: Committee meetings are almost ways more interesting than full board meetings, if you’re willing to sit and sift through the banter. Last week’s State Transportation Board committee meetings are case in point. – In a Legislative Committee discussion about pending metal theft legislation, it was revealed that the state Department of Transportation has had $30,000 worth of steel grates stolen, as well as 20,000 feet of wire – the kind used in wiring traffic lights, for example. – Then came a discussion about privatizing the state’s aviation services and the four King Air 90 aircraft the Georgia Aviation Authority currently uses for passenger flights. The… View Article

Transportation Roundup

TRANSPORTATION ROUNDUP Compiled by Benita M. Dodd   Logistics and innovation: More than 1,100 people have registered already for the fourth annual Georgia Logistics Summit on February 8th, 2012, in Atlanta. Hosted by Georgia’s Center of Innovation for Logistics, the Summit is the only state-led collaborative event of its kind and size in the nation – and draws 85 percent of its participants from the private sector. The deadline for registration is Friday, January 27. Go to http://summit.georgialogistics.org/ to register to attend.  The Center of Innovation for Logistics is led by Page Siplon, who was a panelist in the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s second annual Legislative Policy Briefing in the fall of 2011. Watch his presentation at the Briefing here:… View Article

Transit riders: Pawns in city’s popularity contest

By Benita Dodd In November 2011, MARTA announced it was moving seven bus routes in downtown Atlanta to make way for the $72 million streetcar line that will run from Centennial Olympic Park to the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic site. The streetcar Web site noted that, “The changes will remain in effect until further notice.” But don’t wait for the “further notice” to be that the MARTA routes will be restored. In fact, thanks to the street car construction, now there are changes in store for most Xpress bus riders as well, according to the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority (GRTA). GRTA’s board was asked today to approve the process to reroute the downtown Xpress buses off Peachtree Street.… View Article

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Arthur Brooks, President, American Enterprise Institute (2015) more quotes