Category: Issues

Above All, Do No Digital Harm

John Graham of the National Center for Policy Analysis writes a column in Forbes warning against congressional overreach as telemedicine moves forward across the nation. The article is printed below; the Forbes link is here. First, Do No Digital Harm: Regulating Telemedicine By John Graham Telemedicine, whereby physicians use email, phone, text, or video for prescribing and consultations, is growing rapidly. Seeking to encourage faster uptake of telemedicine, many well-intentioned parties are prodding Congress to take actions which will likely have harmful unintended consequences. So far, Congress has done well. With respect to regulating actual devices, the 21st Century Cures Act, passed by the House in 2015 with overwhelming bipartisan support, is forward thinking. If passed into law,… View Article
As reported in Creative Loafing, the city of Atlanta is considering new measures designed to keep people out of jail who might be better served with a targeted response to the reason for their offense.  This proposed measure is among many being considered within the state of Georgia and even nationally in the criminal justice reform movement, which seeks to curb high incarceration and recidivism rates with more intelligent and cost-saving strategies.… View Article

Don’t Buy Tax-Free Weekends

By Scott Drenkard and Joseph Henchman Sales tax holidays are periods of time when selected goods are exempted from state (and sometimes local) sales taxes. Such holidays have become an annual event in many states, with exemptions for such targeted products as back-to-school supplies, clothing, computers, hurricane preparedness supplies, products bearing the U.S. government’s Energy Star label, and even guns. In 2016, 17 states will conduct sales tax holidays, down from a peak of 19 states in 2010. Georgia’s back-to-school sales tax holiday takes place July 30-31; the two-day holiday is expected to “save” Georgians up to $74.5 million. The list of tax-exempt items is here.  It includes clothing and footwear costing $100 or less, school supplies costing… View Article

NCPA on Higher Education and Online Courses

A July 2016 Issue Brief by Christian Yiu of the National Center for Policy Analysis proposes accreditation reforms to allow for increases in the quality and quantity of online learning in higher education. The Issue Brief is below; for a PDF version that includes references, go to http://www.ncpa.org/pdfs/ib197.pdf. Higher Education and Accrediting Online Courses By Christian Yiu Traditional higher education is not meeting the needs of employers. For example, a survey by the data provider PayScale and the executive development firm Future Workplace found that 87 percent of graduates feel they are ready for the workforce, but only 50 percent of managers feel recent graduates are prepared for a full-time job. In addition, the cost of higher education is… View Article
By Benita Dodd BENITA DODD The media hype surrounding the political parties’ national conventions spotlights the enormous discord created by personalities and politics as the presidential election approaches. Getting short shrift amid slogans and the scramble for dollars and votes are the policy proposals that will affect the lives of Americans — and Georgians — long after November 8. Many citizens dismiss the states’ impact on issues at the national level — federal taxes, immigration, the military and education policy, for example. Too many believe the answers depend on who is elected president and to Congress. It’s not always so. It behooves Georgians to pay close attention to innovative ideas closer to home. States are often incubators, testing life-enhancing policies… View Article

Climate Change Déjà Vu

By Harold Brown Harold Brown, Senior Fellow, Georgia Public Policy Foundation This week in the U.S. Senate, Democrats took to the floor to attack national and state organizations that oppose their climate policies in what they called a “Web of Denial.” The Georgia Public Policy Foundation was among 22 signatories to a letter that denounced Democrats’ attack on free speech.   But what about the so-called Web of Denial?   Global warming is not new. In the middle of the 20th century, climate predictions, patterns and clues were similar to what we hear today, though not as loud and frequent. A Saturday Evening Post headline asked in 1950, “Is the World Getting Warmer? The article reported the first January melting… View Article

Georgia Must Correct Dental Care Disparities

By Nicoleta Serban  More than 58 percent of Georgia’s children – about 1.5 million youngsters –  qualify for public dental benefits through the state’s Medicaid and PeachCare for Kids programs, according to a new Georgia Tech study. Unfortunately, of the 3,872 licensed dentists providing provide preventive services in Georgia, just 337 – 8.7 percent – accept public insurance for children, according to InsureKidsNow.gov. Research conducted by scientists in the Health Analytics Group at Georgia Tech details the extreme oral health care disparities between children eligible for public insurance and those whose families can afford care through other financial means.    Considering common access barriers, there are roughly 865,000 Medicaid- or PeachCare-eligible children in Georgia who need to travel to reach a… View Article
The July 3, 2016 edition of The Marietta Daily Journal published an op-ed by Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd, “Price Controls, a Poor Prescription for Georgia.” The article is below in its entirety; access it online here.  Price Controls, a Poor Prescription for Georgia By Benita Dodd It’s been 15 months since the end of a war — and one country has decided to keep its war-time price controls on meat intact. The result? Social and economic chaos. Hundreds of meat shelves empty, thousands of jobs lost and dozens of businesses gone under. Sound like fiction? Unfortunately, as Georgians from the Greatest Generation may recall, this exact situation plagued the United States in the months following the end of World… View Article

Checking Up On Health: July 5, 2016

Health Policy News and Views Compiled by Benita M. Dodd Mixed Reviews BENITA DODD If you ever wondered why, six years later, it remains difficult to overturn ObamaCare, consider the mixed reviews of the nation’s experts to the white paper Republicans released last month about their planned health insurance reforms. Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute is not impressed .Writing in Forbes, Cannon makes nine points of where he believes Republicans fall short, and prefaces that with this disclaimer: “Don’t get me wrong. The plan is not all bad. Where it matters most, however, House Republicans would repeal ObamaCare only to replace it with slightly modified versions of that law’s worst provisions.” The Reason Foundation’s Peter Suderman echoes… View Article

Expand Access to Care, Not Medicaid

By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Those addressing Georgia’s uninsured and failing hospitals seem stuck between two options: expanding a government program (Medicaid) with its own long list of challenges, or doing nothing. It’s a false choice. Expanding Medicaid is undoubtedly the worst option for providing more Georgians access. For providers – even with more money from the federal government – Medicaid still pays less than their cost. It’s a bad deal for taxpayers: Expansion is estimated to cost more than $7,000 for able-bodied adults; the current Medicaid program spends $3,022. If Georgia’s more than 200,000 low-income adults who already have private insurance opt for the “free” program, the cost will be even higher. It’s also a bad deal for recipients.… View Article

The Foundation’s positions are well thought out and are often ahead of their time.

State Senator Jack Hill more quotes