Category: Issues

What Ever Happened to the Tenth Amendment?

By Kelly McCutchen “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” — Tenth Amendment, Constitution of the United States of America The best way to check the powers of government is to keep government close to the people.  The Tenth Amendment represented an attempt by our Founding Fathers to protect the states from the federal government.  Unfortunately, this protection has been trampled by Congress, and the primary means used has been through unfunded federal mandates. Federal mandates are laws or policies passed by Congress, such as the Motor Voter Law or the Clean Air Act, that state or local governments… View Article

Controlling the Growth of State Government Spending

The challenge facing our elected leaders is clear, and the mood of the citizens they represent requires fundamental change. The following ideas on chang- ing our state government include a five-point pro- gram calling for lower taxes, a reduced role and cost of state government, and greater individual respon- sibility and self-reliance by our citizens.… View Article

Fight Gridlock in Georgia with the Discharge Petition

By Kelly McCutchen For many years, members of the U.S. House of Representatives have managed to have it both ways–on record as favoring popular legislation, but going along with the House “leadership” to ensure that the legislation is never voted on.  Recently, however, this ruse has been uncovered, and a little-known parliamentary procedure, the discharge petition, is being used as a weapon against the entrenched power of committee chairs. The discharge petition gives Congressmen the ability to force a floor debate on legislation being held in committee.  If a majority of House members  signs the discharge petition, the bill is removed from its committee and goes directly to the floor for action.  The discharge petition does not necessarily require a… View Article

Privatization of Hartsfield International Airport

By Lowell Evjen Hartsfield International Airport is considered by many to be Atlanta’s most prized public possession and the economic engine that propelled her to prominence as the capital city of the “New South”. Atlanta’s need for funding to shore up its deteriorating infrastructure prompted the Georgia Public Policy Foundation to conduct a study of privatization options for Hartsfield, which would offer the opportunity for both non-political, professional management and would increase revenues for the city. Background The ownership and operation of public facilities, be they toll roads, power plants, ocean terminals or airports, are undergoing dramatic changes worldwide. As public budgets are being reduced and the advantages of new technology and operating efficiencies are being sought, increased private sector… View Article

Price Controls For Drugs

Paul H. Rubin The Clinton health plan proposes several forms of price controls on pharmaceuticals sold in the United States, including a new bureaucracy (the Advisory Council on Breakthrough Drugs) that will determine if drug prices are “reasonable.” Clintoncare’s pricing proposal embraces classic price controls, and will generate all the unfortunate consequences of price controls. Proponents use specious arguments to justify these controls. Some critics of the pharmaceutical industry use their accounting records to claim that there are large excess profits being generated. However, the Office of Technology Assessment has shown that the return on equity for the pharmaceutical industry is only slightly higher than the average for all industries. This is because accounting figures do not properly reflect large… View Article
By Keith Stirewalt A disturbing national trend hit home recently when the University of Georgia’s Office of Student Affairs proposed the establishment of a speech code that would prohibit “intentionally harassing speech” on campus. Were such a code even arguably constitutional, or had such a clearly misguided approach not been tried elsewhere, perhaps UGA’s plunge into “political correctness” would be less mystifying. The proposed speech code was submitted during the first week of February to the Student Affairs Committee, which is comprised of faculty, students and administrators. After the constitutionality and prudence of the proposed code was challenged, the Committee deferred voting until March 1, while it gathers feedback from the University Community. Proponents of speech codes argue that they… View Article

A Market Approach To Crime

By Kelly McCutchen Eight out of 10 Americans are likely to be victims of violent crime at least once in their lives, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Politicians and the media have finally begun to react to this increasing problem, but they are relying on slogans rather than common sense for their solutions. The best approach to crime is to realign the incentives and disincentives to criminal behavior. First, ensuring that criminals are swiftly caught, convicted and serve the majority of their sentence is the best disincentive to criminal behavior. Second, those who are at the highest risk of committing crimes should be encouraged to improve their situation without resorting to criminal means. Keep Violent Criminals Off the View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has hit another homerun with its Guide to the Issues. This is must reading for anyone interested in public policy in Georgia, and it is an outstanding road map for conservative, common sense solutions to our challengers of today and tomorrow.

Former Georgia Senate Minority Leader Chuck Clay more quotes