Category: Issues

Alternatives for Tort Reform In Georgia

John G. Malcolm An 81-year-old woman from New Mexico spills a cup of McDonald’s coffee on herself and suffers third-degree burns. A jury awards her $160,000 in compensatory damages and $2.7 million in punitive damages. A San Francisco jury awards a former secretary of a prestigious law firm who claimed that she had been sexually harassed $50,000 in compensatory damages for emotional distress and $7.1 million in punitive damages. A $1,000 dispute over a car loan turns into a lawsuit, and the finance company is hit with a $50 million punitive damage award. “Help!” cry businessmen and stockholders. “There is a lawsuit being filed every five minutes! The legal system has gone haywire. It’s those trial lawyers! It’s time for… View Article
Elder J. Olson Recently, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation asked its members for examples of how government affected their lives. The following article is one of the many responses we received. My wife and I founded our small nursing service, Share Care Services, six years ago in Brunswick, Georgia. Sharron had been Executive Vice-President in charge of home health nursing for a large company headquartered in Brunswick, which grew from seven to 48 offices while she was there. She was later recruited by a Savannah hospital, where she ran six offices and assisted in establishing their home nursing service program. I mention Sharron’s background only to demonstrate that she is fully competent to direct a home health care nursing service.… View Article

Is Welfare Unfair?

Pat Wilder For over thirty years the issue of fairness has driven the dramatic expansion of welfare and social subsidy programs. Ironically, this pursuit of fairness has resulted in one of the least fair support systems that could ever be imagined. Neither those receiving nor those financing welfare programs have benefited to any significant extent. It is time to impart true fairness to the welfare system by promoting personal independence while providing temporary assistance. Good intentions are no longer sufficient; we must be honest in our assessments of what has been tried before, and base future efforts on the principle that individuals, not the government, hold the greatest promise for self-fulfillment.   UNFAIR TO BENEFIT RECIPIENTS A welfare system that… View Article
William H. Read and Mark H. Read  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY From software development to telemedicine to broadcasting, many Georgia industries depend on the state’s telecommunications infrastructure. In addition, the telecommunications industry itself already employs some 50,000 professionals in Georgia. These high-paying jobs in growing, dynamic industries are exactly the kinds of jobs that will determine Georgia’s economic future. Telecommunications deregulation will allow Georgia to build upon this solid base, enhance its infrastructure and create jobs. Taking the lead in creating a competitive telecommunications marketplace could prove to be the state’s best economic decision since the construction of Hartsfield International Airport. The primary question being debated today is not whether the local market should be opened, but when and how? The main… View Article
William H. Read and Mark H. Read   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY From software development to telemedicine to broadcasting, many Georgia industries depend on the state’s telecommunications infrastructure. In addition, the telecommunications industry itself already employs some 50,000 professionals in Georgia. These high-paying jobs in growing, dynamic industries are exactly the kinds of jobs that will determine Georgia’s economic future. Telecommunications deregulation will allow Georgia to build upon this solid base, enhance its infrastructure and create jobs. Taking the lead in creating a competitive telecommunications marketplace could prove to be the state’s best economic decision since the construction of Hartsfield International Airport. The primary question being debated today is not whether the local market should be opened, but when and how? The… View Article

Why Georgia Should Consider Prison Privatization II

Georgia could run out of prison space in 1995 despite opening more than 11,000 prison beds over the past four years (at an estimated cost of $369 million). Even worse, the maximum prison capacity is projected to be 3,700 beds short by the middle of next year according to recent reports from the De- partment of Corrections. The problem is that the prisoner popu- lation is growing faster than expected. In just the past year Georgia’s inmate population has grown by 5,233, an in- crease of more than 100 inmates per week. http://www.gppf.org/pub/Privatization/prison2.pdf… View Article

What Ever Happened to the Tenth Amendment?

By Kelly McCutchen “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” — Tenth Amendment, Constitution of the United States of America The best way to check the powers of government is to keep government close to the people.  The Tenth Amendment represented an attempt by our Founding Fathers to protect the states from the federal government.  Unfortunately, this protection has been trampled by Congress, and the primary means used has been through unfunded federal mandates. Federal mandates are laws or policies passed by Congress, such as the Motor Voter Law or the Clean Air Act, that state or local governments… View Article

What Ever Happened to the Tenth Amendment?

By Kelly McCutchen “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.” — Tenth Amendment, Constitution of the United States of America The best way to check the powers of government is to keep government close to the people.  The Tenth Amendment represented an attempt by our Founding Fathers to protect the states from the federal government.  Unfortunately, this protection has been trampled by Congress, and the primary means used has been through unfunded federal mandates. Federal mandates are laws or policies passed by Congress, such as the Motor Voter Law or the Clean Air Act, that state or local governments… View Article

Controlling the Growth of State Government Spending

The challenge facing our elected leaders is clear, and the mood of the citizens they represent requires fundamental change. The following ideas on chang- ing our state government include a five-point pro- gram calling for lower taxes, a reduced role and cost of state government, and greater individual respon- sibility and self-reliance by our citizens.   http://www.gppf.org/pub/Spending/govspend.pdf… View Article

Fight Gridlock in Georgia with the Discharge Petition

By Kelly McCutchen For many years, members of the U.S. House of Representatives have managed to have it both ways–on record as favoring popular legislation, but going along with the House “leadership” to ensure that the legislation is never voted on.  Recently, however, this ruse has been uncovered, and a little-known parliamentary procedure, the discharge petition, is being used as a weapon against the entrenched power of committee chairs. The discharge petition gives Congressmen the ability to force a floor debate on legislation being held in committee.  If a majority of House members  signs the discharge petition, the bill is removed from its committee and goes directly to the floor for action.  The discharge petition does not necessarily require a… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has been a catalyst for common sense proposals—and elected officials are listening and reacting.

U.S. Senator Bill Frist more quotes