Category: Issues

By Benita M. Dodd There’s a belief that the only reason proponents of airport privatization want the city of Atlanta to hand over airport operations to the private sector is so that it would operate more efficiently, therefore cost-efficiently. The airport is already operating efficiently, some say, and that negates the need for privatization. The bottom line is this: The city of Atlanta says it needs $3.2 billion to upgrade its sewer system or it faces court-ordered economic decline brought on by sewer moratoriums. Its options are to obtain the money from ratepayers, continuing to ratchet up sewer rates to the extent that industry and wealthier residents relocate while the 25 percent of households that are low-income must be subsidized.… View Article
By Mac Gibson and Josh Belinfante A rural Georgia hospital was forced to forego renovations and an expansion of its emergency room.[1] Family practitioners in central Georgia can no longer afford the medical malpractice insurance premiums that accompany delivering children or performing Caesarian sections.[2] Many radiologists are no longer reading mammograms because it can make their premiums unaffordable.[3] Malpractice lawsuits and insurance premiums are skyrocketing, and the litigation juggernaut affects the lives of Georgians every day. Georgia is representative of several states across the nation. The American Medical Association currently lists 19 states, including Georgia, as having a “medical malpractice crisis.”[4] A major cause of the crisis is the dramatic increases in the number of medical… View Article
By Mac Gibson and Josh Belinfante There’s no doubt that Georgia is facing a medical malpractice crisis. Named by the American Medical Association as one of the “crisis” states for having the most radical increases in medical malpractice insurance premiums in 2002, Georgia has seen medical malpractice insurance rates soar more than 150 percent in the past three years. The state’s medical malpractice insurance premiums increase every year, and rates will continue to rise so long as health care providers and hospitals face potentially staggering verdicts in medical malpractice cases. In Georgia, the number of medical malpractice claims of $500,000 or more have doubled since 1995, and claims of $1 million and $2 million or more have tripled. As premiums… View Article
By Mac Gibson and Josh Belinfante There’s no doubt that Georgia is facing a medical malpractice crisis. Named by the American Medical Association as one of the “crisis” states for having the most radical increases in medical malpractice insurance premiums in 2002, Georgia has seen medical malpractice insurance rates soar more than 150 percent in the past three years. The state’s medical malpractice insurance premiums increase every year, and rates will continue to rise so long as health care providers and hospitals face potentially staggering verdicts in medical malpractice cases. In Georgia, the number of medical malpractice claims of $500,000 or more have doubled since 1995, and claims of $1 million and $2 million or more have tripled. As premiums… View Article
By Mac Gibson and Josh Belinfante A rural Georgia hospital was forced to forego renovations and an expansion of its emergency room.[1] Family practitioners in central Georgia can no longer afford the medical malpractice insurance premiums that accompany delivering children or performing Caesarian sections.[2] Many radiologists are no longer reading mammograms because it can make their premiums unaffordable.[3] Malpractice lawsuits and insurance premiums are skyrocketing, and the litigation juggernaut affects the lives of Georgians every day. Georgia is representative of several states across the nation. The American Medical Association currently lists 19 states, including Georgia, as having a “medical malpractice crisis.”[4] A major cause of the crisis is the dramatic increases in the number of medical… View Article
By Grace-Marie Turner The health sector is poised to enter a dramatic new era of consumer-driven health care. People are demanding more control over decisions involving their health care and medical coverage. And the Internet allows consumers easy access to a wealth of medical information that was available only to professionals as recently as a few years ago. But public policy is lagging behind. It is suited to an Industrial Age, not our Information Age. Private and public sector bureaucracies, not consumers, still are in charge because they control the finances and therefore the decisions. The United States has been struggling for decades to find a way to provide its citizens with access to health insurance. We have expanded existing… View Article
By Brenda C. Fitzgerald, Albert S. Hanser and David H. Hovey Our medical system is out of control. Costs are rising so rapidly and unpredictably that no busi­ness or individual can sensibly plan for the future. Physicians are limiting services and insurance costs are skyrocketing. Neither government pro­grams nor private insur­ance carriers seem to be able to regain control. One segment of the system most clearly out of control is that which deals with bad medical outcomes. The impact of our inability to control this area is disproportionately greater than the actual number of cases involved and greatly affects cost and the entire health care system. One of the most alarming results has been the decrease in availability of physicians’… View Article
By Brenda C. Fitzgerald, Albert S. Hanser and David H. Hovey Our medical system is out of control. Costs are rising so rapidly and unpredictably that no busi­ness or individual can sensibly plan for the future. Physicians are limiting services and insurance costs are skyrocketing. Neither government pro­grams nor private insur­ance carriers seem to be able to regain control. One segment of the system most clearly out of control is that which deals with bad medical outcomes. The impact of our inability to control this area is disproportionately greater than the actual number of cases involved and greatly affects cost and the entire health care system. One of the most alarming results has been the decrease in availability of physicians’… View Article
By Governor Sonny Perdue  The transformation of health and health care in Georgia forum is another example of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation leading a thoughtful discussion on one of the most challenging issues that Georgia faces. Since forming in 1991, the Foundation has earned a reputation for tackling those tough issues with high quality research and analysis. In areas like taxation, education and welfare reform, the Foundation’s impact has been felt, with effective solutions based on a free-market perspective and the principles of limited government. So I’m glad that you’re now focusing on our health care system. Maintaining personal health, having access to quality health care and paying for health care are concerns that touch every Georgia family. And… View Article

Tougher Air Standards Demand Sensible Solutions

By Benita M. Dodd Good news certainly is proving to be no news now that metro Atlanta’s 2003 ozone season has ended. After all, alarmists wouldn’t want residents to know that the 13-county metro area designated in non-attainment with federal air quality standards is doing quite well, thank you. Air quality has improved despite increasingly strident warnings; despite regional foot-dragging on congestion relief and a massive population, industry and automobile increase since the first two emissions monitors were installed in January 1981. Even so, confused residents are left trying to decipher whether the air indoors or outdoors is the healthier choice during the May-September ozone monitoring season. This year, the state Environmental Protection Division issued 18 color-coded smog day alerts,… View Article

…One of the best things about the Georgia Public Policy Foundation is that it has such a broad membership base.

Dr. Wendy L. Gramm, Former Chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission more quotes