Category: Water

News Release | For Immediate Release June 27, 2018 Contact: Benita Dodd  benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org  (404-256-4050) Foundation ‘Disappointed’ in Supreme Court Ruling on Water Dispute Atlanta – Kyle Wingfield, president of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, issued this statement in response to today’s ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in the water dispute between Florida and Georgia: The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is disappointed the Court today declined the opportunity to end this misguided legal assault on Georgia and remanded the case to the Special Master for further proceedings. We agree with Justice Clarence Thomas, in his dissent, that the Court already had all the facts it needed to make the central determination in the case: that the meager, speculative benefits Florida… View Article

The Glacial Update of Georgia’s Water Plan

By Benita M. Dodd Imagine a group project today where everyone must put their electronic devices in a basket and use a blackboard, notepad, pencil, slide rule or manual typewriter. Consider how many people still drive a 1955 or ‘65 Chevrolet on a daily basis. Then ask yourself if it makes sense to operate a state based on a 50-year-old water use plan. All of the above are ineffective, inefficient, illogical and outdated; much has changed over the decades.  Yet Alabama and Florida sought for decades to restrict Georgia to half-century-old water guidance, even as population, water use and demand have changed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has finally moved beyond the tristate blame game and accepted the need… View Article

Flint’s Water Crisis Hides the Blessing

By Harold Brown President Obama has announced he is heading to Flint, Mich., on May 4th, another sign the Flint Water Crisis is the latest example of protesting too much. The good news is hidden; the crisis is being shouted. The Detroit Free Press announced, “President Obama declares emergency in Flint” and called it “a manmade catastrophe.” The Guardian newspaper headlined it, “Flint water crisis was ‘environmental injustice,’ governor’s taskforce finds.” The Flint waterworks switched its intake from the Detroit water system to the Flint River April 30, 2014. After the switch, Flint didn’t use a corrosion-control treatment to help prevent lead and copper from leaching from water lines. In February 2015, the city of Flint tested tap water in… View Article

Top 10 Global Warming Lies

The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) raises money by scaring Americans about global warming., including in its latest fundraising letter.  Read the article disputing the EDF letter in the Heartland Institute’s Environment & Climate News, Vol. 18 No. 8, September 2015 and is written by James M. Taylor, vice president for external relations and Senior Fellow for environment and energy policy at The Heartland Institute. It’s not unusual for the environmental Left to make false assertions to attract media attention and raise money. But the recent mailer from EDF “may have set a new low,” writes Taylor in a 12-page response to EDF. “The only good thing about EDF’s preposterous mailer is that it can be used to show open-minded people… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd The first thing to know about Georgia’s water worries is that just as Washington doesn’t have a revenue problem but a spending problem, Georgia doesn’t have a water supply problem but a water storage problem. And with a busy session and a cash-strapped state facing Georgia’s legislators, members of a joint committee on water supply got a head start this week on the challenges ahead. There were some outside-the-box proposals, but there’s still more that could be done. Georgia’s annual rainfall averages 60 inches in the mountains, 55 inches across North Georgia and about 45 inches in central Georgia. But now that a judge has ruled that Lake Lanier, metro Atlanta’s major water source, was never… View Article

Environmental Gobbledygook, Economic Gridlock

By Benita M. Dodd Which is the environmentally sound approach, policy-makers seeing job creation as the key to economic recovery or environmental groups pushing for stringent prohibitions on interbasin transfers in Georgia? It may seem like a no-brainer, but even for Georgians who believe they know the answer, there’s one caveat:  It’s an election year.   Georgia legislators are under pressure to satisfy constituents at home who are concerned about losing water from “their” rivers and streams to metro Atlanta. The two Georgias debate, the us-versus-them of rural Georgia and metro Atlanta is fertile ground for fearmongering activists sowing the seeds of environmental “dangers” in moving water from one river basin to another. What’s the connection between the economy and interbasin… View Article

Removing the Political Shortage of Water

By H. Sterling Burnett and Ross Wingo About 82 percent of Americans receive drinking water via publicly owned water systems, according to the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Many of these municipal and regional systems operate at a loss, meaning users’ fees don’t cover the cost of treating and delivering the water. Many water authorities are critically behind on maintenance. They lack the capital to update their water purification and wastewater treatment plants or to secure additional water supplies to meet expected growth in demand. Privatization could solve these water supply problems. The majority of drinking water supply and treatment facilities and wastewater treatment plants in the United States are owned and operated by the government. According to the EPA,… View Article

Fault Feds, not Atlanta, for Lanier’s Woes

By Chick Krautler Today, Lake Lanier is more than 13 feet below its full pool and nearly 10 feet lower than it was this time last year. The state climatologist sees the next few weeks as critical in determining the extent and severity of the 2008 drought. By contrast, the reservoirs downstream from metro Atlanta are virtually full. This fact underscores the assertion of ARC and the metro Atlanta water utilities that Lanier’s record lows have more to do with how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has operated the dam than the drought or claims that Atlanta’s growth has outstripped its water supply. For more than a year and a half, the Corps tried to use Lake Lanier and… View Article

Planning Regional Water Planning Councils

By Brant D. Keller, Ph.D.In the 2008 legislative session, four years after the passage of HB 237, the “Comprehensive Statewide Water Management Planning Act,” state lawmakers approved the framework for the Comprehensive Statewide Water Plan. As part of the plan, the state is currently divided into 10 Regional Water Planning Districts and the (existing) Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District.   For the past three years, discussion has surrounded concepts of demand, supply and return management. Words like desalination, interbasin transfers, non-point source management, reuse and a host of other terms have dominated the conversation of elected officials, state agencies, environmentalists, water professionals and other concerned parties and stakeholders.   This month, according to the plan schedule, these Regional Water Planning… View Article

Wising Up to Georgia’s Water Woes

By Benita M. Dodd and Harold Brown “It is remarkable how many political ‘solutions’ today are dealing with problems created by previous political ‘solutions’,” conservative commentator Thomas Sowell wrote recently on the fires in Southern California. Sowell could have been talking about Anyplace, USA, but his point certainly is especially poignant when it comes to Georgia’s ongoing water challenges. To many observers – including neighboring states – the metro Atlanta region only has itself to blame. Having mismanaged its growth into unbridled sprawl, they argue, metro Atlanta is now expecting “rescue” from everyone else who has water. It’s interesting how providing an adequate water supply is portrayed as in the interests of public safety, until, that is, the “public” is… View Article

Thank you for the great work that the Public Policy Foundation is doing across our state setting a wonderful example. I first ran for the Senate in 1994, and the Foundation was that resource I called upon to be a great help to me as we were articulating positions and formulating public policy initiatives. We appreciate very much your leadership and all that you stand for.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle more quotes