Category: Education

Gary Wolfram of the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy analyzes Hillary Clinton’s proposals on funding higher education and concludes,  “Unfortunately her proposed solutions will not solve the cost and value problems in our higher education system, but will instead make them worse.” Read his commentary in its entirety below; find it on the Pope Center ‘s website at www.popecenter.org/commentaries/article.html?id=3365. Clinton’s Higher Education Proposal Only Makes Our Problems Worse By Gary Wolfram When Bernie Sanders proposed free tuition at public colleges and universities, Hillary Clinton responded with her rival plan, The New College Compact. “Students should never have to borrow to pay for tuition, books, and fees to attend a four-year public college in their state under the… View Article
By Kelly McCutchen KELLY McCUTCHEN Georgia and the rest of the country are experiencing a significant demographic change: We’re seeing more grandparents and children, with fewer folks in between. The Census Bureau projects that Georgia’s elderly population will nearly double between 2010 and 2030. Meanwhile, the number of children ages 5-17 is predicted to rise by 26 percent. This shift will place a serious strain on a decreasing percentage of working-age adults. Georgia has one of the most generous retirement exclusions for income tax purposes in the nation ($130,000 per couple) and, in many counties, those over 65 are exempted from school taxes. So Georgia’s anticipated 1 million-plus increase of retirement-age residents will be particularly significant as state and local… View Article
The Foundation for Excellence in Education distributed this news release today. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 10, 2016 Contact: 850.391.4090/PressShop@ExcelinEd.org GEORGIA: AT THE INTERSECTION OF EDUCATION AND AGING Research Report by ExcelinEd Highlights How Demographic Changes Will Challenge Georgia’s Public Education System Today, at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, Dr. Matthew Ladner of the Foundation for Excellence in Education released original research on the demographic challenges facing Georgia’s education budget, entitled “At the Intersection of Education and Aging: Baby Boomer Retirement, Student Enrollment Growth and the Future of Georgia Education.” The analysis contains both research on the demographic challenges facing Georgia and strategies for substantially improving the academic quality of the state’s K-12 schools at a price taxpayers can afford.… View Article
Kenneth Artz of the Heartland Institute interviewed Foundation Senior Fellow Ben Scafidi on  the Georgia Education Reform Commission’s recommendations. The article is below; access the article on Heartrland’s Web site here: http://news.heartland.org/newspaper-article/2016/02/10/georgia-commission-releases-reform-recommendations Georgia Commission Releases Reform Recommendations By Kenneth Artz A Georgia government commission released a report in December 2015 detailing recommended reforms lawmakers should consider during the recently convened legislative session. The commission called on the state’s legislature to fund charter schools in a more equitable manner and provide more support for districts wishing to explore tying teachers’ pay to student performance. The commission was composed of private-sector leaders, local and state education officials, and lawmakers. The stated goal of the Georgia Education Reform Commission is to “[provide]… View Article

School Choice Benefits: More than test scores

Hundreds of school children braved chilly temperatures to attend the National School Choice Week rally at the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta In a new article for Education Next, Martin R. West of Harvard University explains that research focused solely on standardized test scores will understate the benefits of school choice programs, since effects on high school graduation and college enrollment are stronger—especially among urban minority students. The study builds on early research on school choice by James S. Coleman: The chief beneficiaries of policies that expand parental choice appear to be urban minority students—precisely the group that Coleman argued has the least choice in a public school system in which school assignment depends on where a family lives. And… View Article

Five Reasons for Education Optimism in Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd  BENITA DODD Georgians marked National School Choice Week Jan. 24-30, a week of events highlighted by thousands of yellow “woobie” scarves and celebration of the innovations in education in Georgia. Among the more than 16,000 events held around the nation was the Foundation’s January 27 Leadership Breakfast, a panel discussion with legislators Hunter Hill and Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis. The event was followed by a massive noon rally at the Georgia State Capitol. Championing choice with one voice at the rally were Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, rapper Ludacris and an all-grown-up Keisha Knight Pulliam, who you may recall as The Cosby Show’s Rudy Huxtable. All week, the enthusiasm for school choice was overwhelming… View Article
The cost of higher education is skyrocketing across the nation, including in Georgia. But how does Georgia compare to other states? The average amount of annual in-state tuition and fees at Georgia’s public universities increased by more than 31 percent over the last five years (a greater increase than all but one state). The average amount of tuition and fees, $8,447, ranks below the national average at 31st. Net tuition revenue per FTE (tuition after scholarships and other grants) is $4,468, ranking Georgia 41st highest in the nation. State funding per student is $7,297, which ranks 14th highest in the nation. Amount Rank Average Annual In-State Tuition & Fees at Public Four-Year Institutions, 2015-16 $8,447 31 Percentage Change in In-State… View Article
Everyone likes rankings, and one of the most frequent questions we receive is about where Georgia ranks in terms of K-12 spending and achievement. Georgia’s spending per student is higher than all but one of its neighboring states, according to the most recent data. In terms of student achievement, adjusting for demographic factors that schools can’t control, Georgia ranks 19th highest in the nation. (An analysis of how Georgia compares based on unadjusted NAEP scores is available here.) Clearly, spending doesn’t equal performance, at least not in 2013. The states in Table 1 are listed in order of spending, but their academic achievement varies dramatically. Georgia ranks much higher than most would guess at 19, but Florida (#4) and… View Article
By Ben Scafidi Humans seem to always want more – more time with our families, more health care, more funding for roads, more tax cuts. More funding for our public K-12 schools. And more student achievement. When it comes to getting “more” of something, however, we either (a) have to accept less of something else or (b) increase the productivity of what we’re doing. Governor Nathan Deal and the Georgia General Assembly have been blessed with extra tax revenues over the past two legislative sessions, thanks to their smart economic stewardship and the ingenuity of everyday Georgians. And, in the spirit of “more,” they chose to devote over a billion dollars of those extra revenues to additional funding for our… View Article

When I served four terms in the state Senate, one of the few places where you could go to always and get concrete information about real solutions was the Georgia Public Policy Foundation. That hasn’t changed. [The Foundation] is really right up there at the top of the state think tanks, so you should be very proud of the work that they are doing!

Congressman Tom Price more quotes