Category: Education

EVENT INVITATION December 2, 2014 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Celebrate National School Choice Week January 21, 2015 Atlanta – As you celebrate the Holiday Season, don’t forget to reserve your seat at the Georgia Public Foundation’s first event of 2015, a celebration of National School Choice Week. The Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on Wednesday, January 21, 2015, at Cobb County’s Georgian Club features keynote speaker Dr. Ben Scafidi on, “School Choice: The Next Frontier.” Dr. Scafidi is the state’s foremost education expert, a Senior Fellow at the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Friedman Foundation, and ­the director of Kennesaw State University’s new Education Economics Center. This Leadership Breakfast, which is open to the… View Article
This paper from the Heritage Foundation summarizes the best research on the impact of school choice programs. The conclusion? A growing body of empirical evidence demonstrates the many positive benefits of providing choice in education. Instead of policies to increase spending on the public education system, states and local school districts would better serve students by empowering parents with control over their share of education funding.… View Article
By Arthur C. Brooks MUCH is being written about the preposterously high cost of college. The median inflation-adjusted household income fell by 7 percent between 2006 and 2011, while the average real tuition at public four-year colleges increased over that period by over 18 percent. Meanwhile, the average tuition for just one year at a four-year private university in 2011 was almost $33,000, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. College tuition has increased at twice the rate of health care costs over the past 25 years. Ballooning student loan debt, an impending college bubble, and a return on the bachelor’s degree that is flat or falling: all these things scream out for entrepreneurial solutions. One idea gaining currency… View Article

Never Underestimate the Power of a Field Trip

By Benita M. Dodd  Growing up in a dreary, low-income community where even restaurants were nonexistent – Wentworth, South Africa – there were few tools to power my imagination as a child. It was the days before television (introduced in 1976 to South Africa). It was the era of oppression under apartheid, where everything was choreographed by race and we were second-class citizens without a vote. We didn’t own our home. We traveled by bus; we had no car. To support my family, my dad – a carpenter by trade – worked out of town, coming home for the weekend every two weeks. Today, when I remember how my wardrobe largely comprised my mother’s hit-and-miss sewing attempts and our neighbors’… View Article

Four Drivers of Tomorrow’s Education Reforms

By Kelly McCutchen In “Time for a Reboot,” Checker Finn highlights four drivers of tomorrow’s education reforms: 1. Individualization. Without going crazy—everybody still needs to learn to multiply, to compose a grammatical sentence, to explain the background of the Civil War—education is ripe to shift from batch-processing to customizing kids’ instructional experience, moving from pre-set menus to some version of “grazing.” Not just with regard to what is learned or when, but also the mode of instruction—and the rate at which a youngster moves through school. 2. Technology hugely simplifies individualization. Over time, it will also save money, and some of those savings can be redeployed toward hiring better—but fewer—flesh-and-blood teachers. Completely “virtual” out-of-school education will have limited… View Article
Alpharetta resident Sajan George founded Matchbook Learning which operates innovative blended learning schools in Detroit and Matchbook is being recruited to open schools in other states.  But Georgia is not on Matchbook’s radar and he explained why during the 2014 Georgia Legislative Policy Forum education panel discussion. “At the risk of offending every single person in the room I’ll just be totally blunt. There’s no vision here for education, there isn’t, statewide,: said George. “If you ask my counterparts, the founders and CEOs of other blended and entrepreneurial education systems, Atlanta and Georgia in general is not even on their radar, not even close to their radar. “At least three ingredients that have to be in place for entrepreneurial blended… View Article
A New York Times article praised Clint Bolick for his “aggressive litigation to defend individual liberties.”  Legal Times magazine recognized him as one of the 90 greatest Washington, D.C. lawyers of the previous 30 years. His resume includes co-founder of the Institute for Justice and president of the Alliance for School Choice before he joined the Goldwater Institute seven years ago.  At Goldwater he presides over litigation and one of his favorite phrases is, “I get paid to sue government bureaucrats.” The fifth annual Georgia Legislative Policy Forum audience warmly welcomed Bolick when he delivered the Education Keynote Address on Friday, September 19 in Atlanta. Bolick focused on school choice with a particular emphasis on education savings accounts that are… View Article
For more information on the Georgia Legislative Policy Forum and to register, click here or copy this link http://bit.ly/1oJq9vN and paste in your browser window. By Benita M. Dodd For the fifth year in a row, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation and the Conservative Policy Leadership Institute will bring game-changing, market-oriented, limited-government reforms ideas to the state at the Georgia Legislative Policy Forum in Atlanta on September 19. The daylong Forum, which had an attendance in 2013 of about 250 Georgians – legislators, legislative staff, grassroots activists, policy-makers and interested citizens – has been described as “the opening act of the General Assembly.” For the past four years, the theme was, “Wisdom, Justice and Innovation,” a step beyond… View Article

Utopian Academy Determined to Succeed in Clayton County

Sixth in a series about new Georgia start-up charter public schools By Mike Klein We hear a lot about how reduced state funding caused public school systems to schedule fewer than the 180-day traditional calendar. This year sixth and seventh graders at Utopian Academy for the Arts were scheduled for 190 school days, even as students in the Clayton County public school system are scheduled for 175 days. That would be three more school weeks at Utopian. “Our school year looks a lot different from the traditional public school setting,” said Utopian founder and executive director Artesius Miller. There are other differences. Classrooms are single gender and Utopian offers middle school electives that you do not usually find until high… View Article

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U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson more quotes