Category: Issues

Metro magazine takes a comprehensive look at the game-changing ride-hailing and ride-sharing services, including Lyft and Uber, that are meeting the needs of commuters and reducing operating costs for public transportation. The article by Michaela Kwoka-Coleman, “Mobility-On-Demand: The Future of Transportation,” was posted on December 26, 2017, and can be accessed online here. It examines examples around the nation of how transit agencies are partnering with on-demand services, for first-mile/last-mile transportation, paratransit and carpools.  Public transportation ridership rates have been decreasing for years, and unless transit agencies adapt their service to embrace this innovation, they will lose even more riders. The University of California, Davis Institute of Transportation Studies reported in October that urban ride-hailing passengers decreased… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Part two of Georgia’s two-year legislative session is under way. Weather delays notwithstanding, campaign fundraising for this year’s elections is on legislators’ minds so expect a quick 40 days. The governor announced January 10 that he would call a special session if Georgia became a finalist in online behemoth Amazon’s search for its next headquarters. On January 18, Atlanta became one of 20 candidates (out of 238 applicants) that made the first cut. Before legislators rush off, however, there is some important unfinished business on the table since 2017.  Education legislation held over, especially, needs attention. Last year, legislators approved providing grants of $100,000 to fund facilities for public charter schools, which often struggle to pay… View Article
News Release | For Immediate Release January 16, 2018 Contact: Benita Dodd benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org (404-256-4050) Georgia Public Policy Foundation to Mark National School Choice Week, Unveil Study on Georgia’s K-12 Options Dr. Ben Scafidi Atlanta  – The Georgia Public Policy Foundation celebrates National School Choice Week on Tuesday, January 23, with an 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast at the Georgian Club featuring Foundation Senior Fellow Dr. Ben Scafidi. Dr. Scafidi, a professor of economics at Kennesaw State University and national expert on education funding, will unveil his latest study: “Georgia 2020: Educational Opportunity for All K-12 Students in Georgia.” This Leadership Breakfast is open to the public and is expected to draw about 80 attendees, including elected officials, policymakers, business interests and… View Article
By Russ Moore Russ Moore For the fifth year in a row, in 2017 Site Selection Magazine named Georgia the nation’s No. 1 state for business, a significant milestone reached thanks to a singular focus on workforce development.  Two-thirds of jobs nationally require college training shy of a four-year degree. Georgia’s greatest workforce innovation may be how it brings access to college courses and workforce training – in particular, technical training – directly into public high schools through “schools of choice.” Its growing network of “college and career academies” (CCAs) is especially worthy of national attention. This innovation started in Newnan (Coweta County) in 2000; today, Georgia boasts college and career academies from Rome to Brunswick and dozens of points… View Article

Technology Can Trump Tough Love

By Benita M. Dodd “It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones,” Calvin Coolidge wrote in 1910 to his father, a newly elected senator in Vermont. Coolidge, an advocate of limited government, wrote those words 13 years before becoming the 30th U.S. president in 1923. More than a century later, it seems politicians still need reminding of this imperative. We wrote recently about a proposed victims’ rights constitutional amendment that has had unintended consequences.  Feel-good and tough-love approaches are especially appealing in election years. This year is no exception. Candidates and legislators often woo voters with minimal regard for the cost or consequences of their proposals. Sometimes, efforts to legislate and regulate turn ordinary… View Article

Don’t Miss the Bus on Transit

By Benita M. Dodd Most of the large-scale development in Atlanta in recent years has been near transit stations, The Atlanta Business Chronicle reports. According to the narrative, corporations are being motivated to move close to MARTA stations because millennial employees prefer staying off the highways and living closer to their jobs.   Interestingly, none of these moves have resulted in improved MARTA ridership. Unlinked rail passenger trips dropped 1.16 percent in the first half of 2017 over the same period in 2016, while bus ridership dropped 3.31 percent. (An unlinked passenger trip is a trip on one transit vehicle; each transfer is counted as a separate “trip.”) This decline is not temporary. It’s a national trend, a result of lower… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Georgia ranks an impressive No. 7 out of all 50 states in the 2017 Economic Freedom of North America report, released this week by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation in conjunction with Canada’s Fraser Institute. Georgia scored a total of 7.5 out of 10 in rankings on government spending, taxation and labor market restrictions. Based on 2015 data (the latest available), the Fraser Institute’s 13th annual report measures the degree to which the policies and institutions of states/provinces in the United States, Canada and Mexico support economic freedom. At the top in the United States is New Hampshire, scoring 8.3 out of 10. Ahead of Georgia were Florida and Texas (tied for No. 2, scoring 8.1),… View Article
By Adam N. Michel Adam N. Michel Tax reform is long overdue. The current tax code is suffocating job creation and holding down wages at home. At the same time, it’s giving American businesses far too many reasons to move overseas. Washington has not significantly changed the federal tax system in more than 30 years. Meanwhile, our major foreign competitors – friendly and otherwise – have made their tax schemes far more business- and worker-friendly. As a result, American businesses face one of the highest corporate income tax rates in the world – a rate that crimps their ability to pay higher wages and create more jobs. The good news is that lawmakers in Washington are mounting a serious effort… View Article

Marsy’s Law of Unintended Consequences

By Benita M. Dodd It’s hard to fathom the depth of the pain and suffering of crime victims and families left behind. For Henry Nicholas, the experiences of his family after his sister was murdered inspired his mission to protect victims. A student at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Marsalee “Marsy” Nicholas died after being shot in 1983 by her ex-boyfriend, Kerry Conley. Marsy’s brother told The Los Angeles Times: “After the funeral service, we were driving home and stopped at a market so my mother could just run in and get a loaf of bread. And there in the checkout line was my sister’s murderer, glowering at her.” He said the family was not told the killer… View Article
NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release November 30, 2017 Contact: Benita Dodd, Georgia Public Policy Foundation benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org | (404) 256-4050  Foundation President Kelly McCutchen Stepping Down at Year’s End Atlanta – Kelly McCutchen, President and CEO of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation since 2010, is stepping down at the end of 2017 to devote more of his time to health care policy. Kelly McCutchen McCutchen, who was Assistant Vice President in the Trust Department of Trust Company Bank in Atlanta before joining the Georgia Public Policy Foundation in 1993, will continue his relationship with the Foundation as a Senior Fellow.  In 2018, he will become Executive Director of the Healthcare Institute for National Renewal and Innovation (HINRI), a venture philanthropy located… View Article

The most effective and respected organization in Georgia—when they speak, the decision-makers listen.

The late U.S. Senator Paul Coverdell more quotes