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By Grace-Marie Turner The health sector is poised to enter a dramatic new era of consumer-driven health care. People are demanding more control over decisions involving their health care and medical coverage. And the Internet allows consumers easy access to a wealth of medical information that was available only to professionals as recently as a few years ago. But public policy is lagging behind. It is suited to an Industrial Age, not our Information Age. Private and public sector bureaucracies, not consumers, still are in charge because they control the finances and therefore the decisions. The United States has been struggling for decades to find a way to provide its citizens with access to health insurance. We have expanded existing… View Article
By Brenda C. Fitzgerald, Albert S. Hanser and David H. Hovey Our medical system is out of control. Costs are rising so rapidly and unpredictably that no busi­ness or individual can sensibly plan for the future. Physicians are limiting services and insurance costs are skyrocketing. Neither government pro­grams nor private insur­ance carriers seem to be able to regain control. One segment of the system most clearly out of control is that which deals with bad medical outcomes. The impact of our inability to control this area is disproportionately greater than the actual number of cases involved and greatly affects cost and the entire health care system. One of the most alarming results has been the decrease in availability of physicians’… View Article
By Brenda C. Fitzgerald, Albert S. Hanser and David H. Hovey Our medical system is out of control. Costs are rising so rapidly and unpredictably that no busi­ness or individual can sensibly plan for the future. Physicians are limiting services and insurance costs are skyrocketing. Neither government pro­grams nor private insur­ance carriers seem to be able to regain control. One segment of the system most clearly out of control is that which deals with bad medical outcomes. The impact of our inability to control this area is disproportionately greater than the actual number of cases involved and greatly affects cost and the entire health care system. One of the most alarming results has been the decrease in availability of physicians’… View Article
By Governor Sonny Perdue  The transformation of health and health care in Georgia forum is another example of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation leading a thoughtful discussion on one of the most challenging issues that Georgia faces. Since forming in 1991, the Foundation has earned a reputation for tackling those tough issues with high quality research and analysis. In areas like taxation, education and welfare reform, the Foundation’s impact has been felt, with effective solutions based on a free-market perspective and the principles of limited government. So I’m glad that you’re now focusing on our health care system. Maintaining personal health, having access to quality health care and paying for health care are concerns that touch every Georgia family. And… View Article

Tougher Air Standards Demand Sensible Solutions

By Benita M. Dodd Good news certainly is proving to be no news now that metro Atlanta’s 2003 ozone season has ended. After all, alarmists wouldn’t want residents to know that the 13-county metro area designated in non-attainment with federal air quality standards is doing quite well, thank you. Air quality has improved despite increasingly strident warnings; despite regional foot-dragging on congestion relief and a massive population, industry and automobile increase since the first two emissions monitors were installed in January 1981. Even so, confused residents are left trying to decipher whether the air indoors or outdoors is the healthier choice during the May-September ozone monitoring season. This year, the state Environmental Protection Division issued 18 color-coded smog day alerts,… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd Good news certainly is proving to be no news now that metro Atlanta’s 2003 ozone season has ended. After all, alarmists wouldn’t want residents to know that the 13-county metro area designated in non-attainment with federal air quality standards is doing quite well, thank you. Air quality has improved despite increasingly strident warnings; despite regional foot-dragging on congestion relief and a massive population, industry and automobile increase since the first two emissions monitors were installed in January 1981. Even so, confused residents are left trying to decipher whether the air indoors or outdoors is the healthier choice during the May-September ozone monitoring season. This year, the state Environmental Protection Division issued 18 color-coded smog day alerts,… View Article
By Newt Gingrich The nation’s health-care crisis has infected every state including Georgia, where acute symptoms have appeared. Nine percent of Georgians have spent an entire year uninsured, according to the Georgia Department of Community Health’s Georgia Healthcare Coverage Project, while 1.3 million are covered by a Medicaid program whose budget continues to outpace projections. State officials have been forced to contemplate cuts in spending, and therefore in programs. Simultaneously, vital services such as obstetric care and emergency room surgery are threatened as doctors decide they can no longer practice beneath a burden of skyrocketing medical liability premiums and the threat of litigation from trial lawyers. The Georgia Board for Physician Workforce, a legislative advisory board, says Georgia already ranks… View Article
By Wendell Cox and Ronald D. Utt As much as 20 percent of federal transportation funding goes to transit, which serves less than 2 percent of travelers. Of the many rationales offered in defense of disproportionately high transit spending, the most novel put forth this year is the bizarre claim by the Surface Transportation Policy Project (STPP) that auto ownership by the working poor leads to a more limited standard of living and diminished home ownership opportunities. Members of lower-income households who cannot afford cars account for a majority (approximately two-thirds) of today’s transit riders, and the emergence of prosperity among this group threatens transit with the loss of its captive constituency and further shrinkage of its miniscule market share.… View Article

State Needs to Come Around to Roundabouts

By Dan Winn Even a transportation novice observing the graceful traffic flow around Ellijay’s bustling town square in Northeast Georgia would come away mystified that there are so few circular intersections, or “roundabouts,” in the state and the nation. Like Ellijay’s 2-year-old roundabout surrounding a memorial to slain warriors, these traffic devices have a whole lot more than grace going for them. As a more efficient method of moving traffic through most intersections, they have the potential to save this nation millions of gallons of gasoline and millions of hours in commute time, all while reducing traffic deaths and injuries. A roundabout, in its simplest form, is a circle of road that surrounds a raised island in the middle of… View Article
By Ronald Utt Recent projections by the Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office reveal that the highway trust fund will run out of money during FY 2009. Unless the fund is replenished soon, federal spending on highways could decline significantly as the fund reverts to a spend-as-you-earn basis until a permanent remedy is enacted. Until then, one solution is to re-concentrate the fund’s focus on highway investment and safety by abandoning the many low priority and non-transportation diversions that now encumber the federal program. The soon-to-be-empty trust fund is a direct consequence of recent congressional overspending in excess of the fuel tax revenues that replenish the fund as well as decades of congressional mandates allowing non-highway… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation is our state’s leading organization promoting government transparency. The Secretary of State’s office shares the Foundation’s commitment to transparency and responsible stewardship of taxpayer dollars, which is why our agency was the first in Georgia to publish its budget and spending data on a public transparency website.

Karen Handel, Georgia Secretary of State more quotes