Category: The Forum

In 2016, Senate legislation seeking to clarify that Direct Primary Care is not insurance did not make it out of the Georgia Senate. In 2017, the Senate unanimously approved similar DPC legislation and the House Insurance Committee reported favorably on the bill on March 20, but the House Rules Committee did not place the legislation on the calendar by March 30 for a House vote before Sine Die. By Loren King In primary care medicine, offices visits require understanding and knowledge of multiple complicated and interrelated medical, social and economic concerns to adequately parse decision making. Health care is complicated and personal and, at its very foundation, it is conversation, friendship and hope. Unfortunately, the economics of an office visit… View Article

Friday Facts: March 31, 2017

It’s Friday!  Quotes of note “Problems arise when political decision-makers attempt to distort what scientific studies conclude, but also when scientists and others attempt to exert influence on policy decisions by selectively presenting, or even distorting, scientific findings. While there is extensive media coverage of the former, the examination of how science may be politicized inside federal regulatory decision-making processes has been largely limited to academia and the scientific community.” – Susan Dudley “The government’s monopoly is what has allowed it to produce so bad a product for so long.” – David A. Henderson “The truth is, that, even with the most secure tenure of office, during good behavior, the danger is not, that the judges will be too firm… View Article

Friday Facts: March 24, 2017

It’s Friday!  Quotes of note “It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere.” – Voltaire “A good judge doesn’t give a whit about politics or the political implications of his or her decision.” – Neil Gorsuch “I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education. This is the true corrective of abuses of constitutional power.” – Thomas Jefferson  Transportation Streetcar sensitive: Mayor Kasim Reed is criticizing The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s coverage of the Atlanta Streetcar in two recent articles,… View Article

Legislators Should Heed the Forgotten Man

By Kelly McCutchen A host of tax bills are up for consideration as the Georgia General Assembly enters its final week: tax breaks for the music industry, tax breaks for big construction projects, tax breaks on jet fuel, taxes on Internet purchases, taxes on ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft, and cuts in the individual income tax rate. On the campaign trail, politicians often criticize tax breaks for special interests and the use of the tax code to “pick winners and losers.” Despite that, the siren song of job creation and promises of economic growth are clearly hard to resist; several of these bills are passed each year. As with pork barrel spending projects, the difference between competitive economic… View Article
This testimony on Direct Primary Care was prepared for delivery to the Georgia House Insurance Committee on March 20, 2017. The legislation, S.B. 50, was presented by Senator Hunter Hill (Watch from the 53-minute mark at https://livestream.com/accounts/19771805/events/6811883/videos/152225554) By Benita M. Dodd, Vice President, Georgia Public Policy Foundation  The Georgia Public Policy Foundation understands the challenges lawmakers face in extending access to health care for the impoverished as well as those living in Georgia’s rural areas. We believe one way to address this is through an exciting, well tested approach: Direct Primary Care, which provides access, quality and control and an affordable monthly rate. The Foundation has highlighted physicians practicing this approach in 2014, both at a May Leadership Breakfast… View Article

Friday Facts: March 17, 2017

It’s Friday!  Events March 23: The deadline is Tuesday to sign up for the Foundation’s March Leadership Breakfast, “Capitol Insight,” with keynote speaker Lynn Westmoreland, who retired recently after six terms as a Congressman from Georgia. Cobb County’s Georgian Club, 8 a.m. $30. Information and registration here. Quotes of note “One single object … [will merit] the endless gratitude of the society: that of restraining the judges from usurping legislation.” – Thomas Jefferson, 1825  “If Congress can apply money indefinitely to the general welfare, and are the sole and supreme judges of the general welfare, they may take the care of religion into their own hands; they may establish teachers in every State, county, and parish, and… View Article

How States Can Break the Health Care Logjam

By Kelly McCutchen In the pre-dawn hours of Sunday, January 22 a tornado, one of 40 over two days in Georgia, ripped through the tiny South Georgia town of Adel. Seven people died; the wounded were treated at the local hospital five minutes away. Just three days earlier, that local hospital had announced it would close its emergency room – the only ER in Cook County – at the end of February. Cook Medical Center is hemorrhaging about $2.6 million a year, mostly due to the emergency room. Tift Regional Medical Center plans to offer expanded hours at a non-emergency medical clinic in Adel while shifting emergency services to its hospital in Tifton, 24 miles away. Plans are in the… View Article
By Ross Coker The Georgia Public Policy Foundation and other organizations committed to intelligent criminal justice reform in Georgia, have for some time pointed out Georgia’s astronomical rates of parole and probation, the highest in the nation by far. Georgia has 4,565 adults on probation per 100,000 adults, whereas that number falls to 2,200 for the next state on the list, Rhode Island. Parole and probation join the larger problem in criminal justice reform efforts known as “collateral consequences:” things beyond fines and prison sentences such as restrictions on civic participation that prevent ex-offenders from living the same lives as those who have not, even if they desire to return to a law-abiding, contributory role in society. The justification… View Article

Friday Facts: March 10, 2017

It’s Friday!  Condolences  Dudley Rochelle Carter, who served as a board member for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, passed away on March 4 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s syndrome. We were honored to have her counsel and support and offer our sincere condolences to her family, friends and colleagues.  Joe Rogers Sr., the founder of Waffle House, died March 3 at age 97. The son of a railway crane operator, Rogers was a short-order cook whose concept of a quick-service, limited-menu eatery grew to more than 1,800 locations with sales of $1.03 billion in 2016. In 2000, he published a memoir, “Who’s Looking Out for the Poor Old Cash Customer?” Our condolences to his family, friends… View Article
By Benita M. Dodd March 12-18 is Sunshine Week. Launched in 2005, the initiative promotes open government and pushes back against “excessive official secrecy.” Sunshine Week is promoted by the American Society of News Editors and Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. Events of the past year reinforce that the media themselves need self-examination regarding the dappled coverage of events. Fortunately, enough outlets and citizen journalists exist and compete to the extent that citizens receive the news one way or another and, “Truth will out.” Not so at the General Assembly as the 40-day session reaches its 2017 halfway point. Few of Georgia’s 10 million residents reach the State Capitol to follow along in person. Happily for many,… View Article

It’s so often a lack of information that keeps us from getting involved. The Foundation is doing for the public what many could not do for themselves. Anytime that we’re given the truth, people can make good decisions.

Deen Day Smith, Chairman of the Board, Cecil B. Day Investment Company more quotes