Category: The Forum

Friday Facts: January 29, 2016

It’s Friday!  Celebrating National School Choice Week at the Foundation’s event Wednesday are (from left) Foundation President Kelly McCutchen, education innovator Mike Davis, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and State Sen. Hunter Hill. Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, there were 7.5 million cellphone users across the nation. One year later, the number surpassed 10 million and the first commercial text message was sent. This year, smartphone users in the United States are expected to surpass 207.2 million; by 2015, text messages were at 169.3 billion a year in the United States! It’s why we’ll be launching our new Web site soon!  Events February 17: Register now… View Article

Five Reasons for Education Optimism in Georgia

By Benita M. Dodd  BENITA DODD Georgians marked National School Choice Week Jan. 24-30, a week of events highlighted by thousands of yellow “woobie” scarves and celebration of the innovations in education in Georgia. Among the more than 16,000 events held around the nation was the Foundation’s January 27 Leadership Breakfast, a panel discussion with legislators Hunter Hill and Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis. The event was followed by a massive noon rally at the Georgia State Capitol. Championing choice with one voice at the rally were Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, rapper Ludacris and an all-grown-up Keisha Knight Pulliam, who you may recall as The Cosby Show’s Rudy Huxtable. All week, the enthusiasm for school choice was overwhelming… View Article
A January 22, 2016 article by Dave Williams in The Atlanta Business Chronicle quotes Foundation Vice President Benita Dodd on the folly of rail expansion for metro Atlanta. The article is below; access the article online here. Market forces will power state’s new transportation plan By Dave Williams Toll lanes across the entire top end of the Perimeter and on Georgia 400 north to Atlanta’s far suburbs. Rebuilt interchanges at Interstate 285 and I-20 east and west of Atlanta. And new truck-only lanes on I-75 from Macon to McDonough. All are part of an ambitious $10 billion, 10-year transportation plan Gov. Nathan Deal announced Jan. 12. After some initial experiments, the plan’s unprecedented scope shows theGeorgia Department of View Article
EVENT INVITATION January 26, 2016 Contact Benita Dodd at 404-256-4050 or benitadodd@georgiapolicy.org Criminal Justice Reform Leader Judge Michael P. Boggs Keynotes Feb. 17 Event Atlanta – Criminal justice in Georgia is transforming from an “Ugly Duckling” with the highest rate of correctional supervision in the nation (one in 13) to a “Cinderella” story of reform, thanks to committed, bipartisan leadership. And leading that effort is Georgia Appeals Court Judge Michael P. Boggs, co-Chair of Georgia’s Criminal Justice Reform Council in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. Judge Boggs will be the keynote speaker at “Georgia Criminal Justice Reform: Looking Ahead, Staying Ahead,” the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s February 17 Leadership Breakfast, 8 a.m. at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. The… View Article

Checking Up On Health: January 26, 2016

Health Care News and Views Compiled by Benita Dodd Happy New Year! BENITA DODD The Legislature’s back in session; the presidential candidates’ ranks are thinning and you’re probably wondering whether there’s anything worthwhile amid the rhetoric. Governor Nathan Deal has made it quite clear that Medicaid expansion is not on his agenda, and it’s a wise move. First, why would you spend scarce state dollars on able-bodied individuals? Second, why would you force low-income Georgians into a program that is dogged by poor outcomes and low physician participation? Third, as I wrote recently in a commentary, there are opportunities in Georgia to expand health care options without expanding Medicaid. For example, the 2010 health law, which requires that most… View Article
By Robert Krol Each year, state and local governments decide on which transportation infrastructure projects to build. Often, priority goes to projects directed at reducing highway congestion or air pollution. The economic backbone of the decision process is supposed to be an objective cost-benefit analysis. However, calculating the costs and benefits of any major project is technically difficult. Cost estimates require a determination of labor and material quantities and prices. Benefit estimates require forecasting economic growth, demographic trends, and travel patterns in the region. Clouding the analysis is the fact that this decision process takes place in a political environment. Politicians love the publicity they get at the opening of a high-occupancy vehicle lane or the expansion of a mass… View Article

Friday Facts: January 22, 2016

It’s Friday!  Then and Now Did you know? In 1991, the year the Georgia Public Policy Foundation was established, according to one advertisement (May 1991), a business-class 386/33 personal computer with 4MB of RAM, a 200MB hard disk and 14-inch display sold for $4,299 ($7,544 in today’s dollars). A similarly-equipped 486-33 was $7,699, or $13,511 today. Source: ZDNET.com  Events  January 27: MONDAY is the deadline to register for the Foundation’s annual National School Choice Week celebration. Join Georgia State Sen. Hunter Hill, State Rep. Mike Dudgeon and education innovator Mike Davis for “Georgia Education: Reforms and Recommendations,” a Leadership Breakfast 8 a.m. Wednesday, January 27 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. This event is open to the public.… View Article

The 2016 State of the State Address

Gov. Nathan Deal delivered the annual State of the State address and introduced his 2017 budget recommendations last week. Here are some of the recommendations and comments: More support for high-demand skills training: “…over the past three years, we have identified 11 areas where a student will receive a 100 percent tuition HOPE Grant to obtain that training. These Strategic Industries Workforce Development Grants cover 140 programs, and I am recommending that we add industrial maintenance this year to that important list.” Additional funding for Dual Enrollment: “Our Move On When Ready legislation from last year, coupled with additional funding for Dual Enrollment, has greatly accelerated the pace of many students’ educational journeys. This allows high school students… View Article
The cost of higher education is skyrocketing across the nation, including in Georgia. But how does Georgia compare to other states? The average amount of annual in-state tuition and fees at Georgia’s public universities increased by more than 31 percent over the last five years (a greater increase than all but one state). The average amount of tuition and fees, $8,447, ranks below the national average at 31st. Net tuition revenue per FTE (tuition after scholarships and other grants) is $4,468, ranking Georgia 41st highest in the nation. State funding per student is $7,297, which ranks 14th highest in the nation. Amount Rank Average Annual In-State Tuition & Fees at Public Four-Year Institutions, 2015-16 $8,447 31 Percentage Change in In-State… View Article

The Georgia Public Policy Foundation has forged over the years many positive changes in Georgia, in its nonpartisan but very specific way.

U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson more quotes