Friday Facts: May 1, 2015

Friday Facts
May 1st, 2015 by Leave a Comment

It’s Friday!

Events

This painting by Steve Penley hangs in the Georgia Secretary of State's office at the Georgia Capitol
This painting by Steve Penley hangs in the Georgia Secretary of State’s office at the Georgia Capitol.

May 14: The deadline is Tuesday, May 12, to register for, “License to Work,” the Foundation’s 8 a.m. Leadership Breakfast on May 14 at Cobb County’s Georgian Club. Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp will focus on jobs, licensing and the role of government. For information and registration, go here.

October 15: Mark your calendar! The sixth annual Legislative Policy Forum, takes place at the Renaissance Waverly Atlanta. The theme is, “Wisdom, Justice and Opportunity,” expanding on the Georgia motto of, “Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation.” Details to follow; review the 2014 Forum here.

Quotes of Note

“No people will tamely surrender their liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and virtue is preserved. On the contrary, when people are universally ignorant, and debauched in their manners, they will sink under their own weight without the aid of foreign invaders.” – Samuel Adams

“The whole point of competition in the market is to create economic efficiency which, by its very nature, means eliminating the less efficient producers. Confusion about the difference between maintaining competition and maintaining competitors has long plagued anti-trust law on both sides of the Atlantic. But Americans seem in recent years to be recognizing the difference.” – Thomas Sowell

“No. 25: The mind can absorb no more than the seat can endure.” – Morton C. Blackwell, “The Laws of the Public Policy Process”

Government reform

Avoid ‘stealth regulation:’ A recent study finds that agencies avoided the notice-and-comment process, which facilitates public participation in rulemaking, in almost 52 percent of regulations finalized from 1995 to 2012. Meanwhile, between fiscal years 2004 and 2013 only about 8 percent of final regulations underwent the scrutiny established to ensure agency accountability. Source: Mercatus Center

Backing ALEC: Three companies have refused to drop their support of the American Legislative Exchange Council. The National Center for Public Policy Research hailed the steadfastness of Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Honeywell: “For daring to try to reduce the regulatory burdens on business and improve the American economic landscape, the left vilifies ALEC. And since ALEC is effective, liberals such as the proponents are working to silence ALEC by using corporate America as a pawn.”

Energy and environment

Asthma myth: A new study authored by a research team led by Dr. Corrine Keet of Johns Hopkins Children’s Center has found no link between outdoor air pollution and childhood asthma, Environment & Climate News reports. The study of 23,000 U.S. children points to poverty, not air pollution. Worse, costly stricter federal ozone rules under consideration could exacerbate poverty. (See Friday Flashback below.) Source: Heartland Institute

Education

Actions have consequences: Charter schools are public schools that sign an academic performance contract in exchange for greater flexibility to innovate than traditional public schools; they may be shut down if they don’t deliver. New Urban Learning, the company that manages one of three Detroit charter schools that will vote May 6 on whether to form a union, has told teachers it’s walking away from University Yes Academy, the school it founded. Source: Mlive.com

Charter kudos: The Gwinnett School of Math, Science & Tech in Lawrenceville is ranked No. 27 in The Washington Post’s list of America’s Most Challenging High Schools. The charter school is the top Georgia school on the list; no other broke the top 100. Find out if your school made the list here.

Friday Flashback

This month in the archives: In May 2004, the Foundation focused on Asthma Awareness Month with, “Asthma and Pollution: A Puzzling Picture: “The 10 counties with the highest asthma rates averaged 3.6 times the metro region’s rate. None were urban counties – not even close to or downwind from the non-attainment area.”

Media

Social media: The Foundation’s Facebook page has 2,388 “likes.” Please share it to help us reach 2,400 “likes” in our 24th year in Georgia! Join us on twitter.com/gppf and share the Friday Facts!

Foundation in the media: The Coastal Courier and Bryan County News published Harold Brown’s commentary, “Deepwater Horizon: Drawn-Out Tempest in a Teacup.” Kelly McCutchen’s analysis of the legislative session was printed in The Athens Banner-Herald. Kelly’s commentary, “Economic Diversity, State Leadership: A Recipe for Georgia’s Success,” was printed by Watchdog.org.

The Forum: Benita Dodd’s, “Checking Up On Health,” takes a look at Asthma Awareness Month, ailing airline passengers, sedentary Americans and why an aspirin a day may not be for you.

Visit www.georgiapolicy.org to read our latest commentary, “The Concrete Road Less Traveled,” by Benita Dodd.

Have a great weekend!

Kelly McCutchen and Benita Dodd  

FRIDAY FACTS is made possible by the generosity of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation’s donors. If you enjoy the FRIDAY FACTS, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution to help advance our important mission by clicking here. Visit our Web site at www.georgiapolicy.org. Join The Forum at http://forum.georgiapolicy.org/. Become a fan of the Foundation on Facebook and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/gppf.

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