Video Forum: Eight Important Issues That Impact Georgians

March 28th, 2014 by 1 Comment

Atlanta Journal-Constitution conservative columnist Kyle Wingfield and Georgia Center for Opportunity vice president Eric Cochling discuss eight issues that impact Georgians.  This conversation was recorded at our “Georgia Legislative Roundup” policy leadership breakfast on March 26 at The Georgian Club in Cobb County.  Segment introductions by Kelly McCutchen.

Eric Cochling:  Georgia Criminal Justice Reform Success

Kyle Wingfield: Balanced Budget Constitutional Amendment Initiatives

Eric Cochling: Child Welfare and Foster Care Reform

 Kyle Wingfield: Traffic Congestion and Transportation $$$

Eric Cochling:  Education Funding and School Choice

Kyle Wingfield: Georgia Income Tax and Pension Reform

Eric Cochling: Medicaid and Access to Health Care

Kyle Wingfield: Entrenched Threats to Innovation

 

One thought on “Video Forum: Eight Important Issues That Impact Georgians

  1. Georgia is a critical point where it comes to foster children. What we have been doing for centuries, obviously doesn’t work. Doing it differently is imperative. Is privatized care the answer?? Or is TRAUMA RESPONSIVE CARE the answer? I can help you understand the answer to that question! I have some incredible suggestions that might be worth hearing. Will it change the outcome we are currently experiencing with children? No, but it will give you far more clarity, understanding and I think will help you with direction. Give me 60 minutes and I will change how you and your staff views what it truly feels like to grow up and age out, FOSTER.
    I have overcome my brutal childhood, traumatic foster care past, and being thrown to the wolves at 18. I graduated at 16, but no one guided me into college.

    At 38 years old, I fell to my knees asking God to help me put my life back together because America deemed me unworthy. All they saw was my ‘Scarlet Letter’.

    But today, I am a congressional award winner, a Point of Light Honoree, author of “From Foster to Fabulous.” I am the founder of http://www.FosteringSuperStars.org where the “Garden of Pain” lives in my backyard. I travel across the nation educating foster parents on trauma through the eyes of the child. I teach the children to “Rise Above and Reach Beyond”. I take their pain and I trade it for a hug, a blanket of hugs my church hand sews for the children. You (America) never gave me a hand up, they merely added to my over flowing luggage of trauma. I am also a foster adoptive parent and a very popular keynote speaker. I just finished presenting The Journey to 700+ at the National Foster Parent Conference in Orlando. Just returned yesterday.

    YOU MUST take THE JOURNEY of the foster child before you can create legislation concerning foster children. Supreme Court Max Baer said, “Young lady, you have opened my eyes and have given me much to think about.” He thought it was a merely choosing the path of ‘right’ over the path of ‘wrong’. After hearing The Journey, A Storytelling event of trauma suffered my entire life through brutal abuse in my bio life and traumatic care while living in foster care. (Round Table Summit PA, November 2013 Keynotes, both of us)
    Take The Journey and then decide how to care for America’s forgotten and MISUNDERSTOOD children. How can you make policy and rules if you don’t truly know what it is to be FOSTER… (Free of charge!) http://www.fromfostertofabulous.com Ramaglia, Alpharetta, GA

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